The Treaty of Versailles

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Explain why The Treaty of Versailles (1919) was a poor treaty settlement and unsatisfactory for both the victorious and defeated nations. The Treaty of Versailles (1919) was a crash of interests, distinguishing themselves dramatically from one another. This alliance occured between the nations of France,Great Britain and USA -the winners from The First World War and Germany- the defeated country, which was not given the chance to take part in the negotiations. This event is accepted to be as one of the most detereorating treaties, designed to create peace within Europe. However the settlement was disaffected, due to the fact that not only it lacked to satisfy the needs of the victorious nations,but it caused economic and political instability in the Old Continent. As a concequence of this only 20 years later Europe went through its most tremendous conflict- The Second World War. When looked from the side of the trimphant countries The Treaty of Versailles did not fufil any of their demandings. France's hatred towards Germany spured the desire of economically destroying the country to a point of not having a chance for future revenge. Indeed, Clemenceau stated: "The Germans may take Paris, but that will not prevent me from going on with the war. We will fight on the Loire, we will fight on the Garonne, and we will fight even in the Pyrenees. […] We shall insist on the imposition of penalties on the authors of the abominable crimes committed during the war." At that state the negotiator wanted to recieve the French territory, taken in the 18th century back from Germany. His wish was also the defeated country to struggle in recovering. However, when looked at the years before the Second World War Germany stabalized its condition - “[…]Exports increased by 40 cent between 1925 and 1929. The fact remains that Germnay’s economic performance compared favourably with the economic performances of England and France between 1925 and 1929 .”, linking to the fact that...
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