The Summer Day

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The Summer Day
Mary Oliver’s poem, “The Summer Day,” touches the reader in a moving, inspirational way. The author crafts the poem, making it seems like you are the one asking yourself the questions at the beginning of the poem. In the book of life, you are the one that decides what you really believe in. The poem is making the reader think exactly how precious life really is, whether you find beauty in God or nature. The language that Mary Oliver uses is truly magnificent that inspire different people through their own accomplishments. Depending on how you view the world, the meaning of the poem may vary from person to person but the last two lines remain the same for everyone, “tell me, what is it you plan to do with your one wild and precious life” (18-19).

Right off the bat, the author asks the reader “who made the world?” (1). That question alone has trillions of different answers, depending on what God you believe in or if you even believe in a God. The poem continues on to ask the reader “who made the swan, and the black bear? Who made the grasshopper?” (2-3). Once again, Mary Oliver puts you in control of the poem and makes it seem like you are asking yourself exactly how these creatures got on this earth. Are you a believer of creationism or evolution? These first three lines of the poem really determine how the rest of the poem flows into your mind.

The creatures used in this poem create a magnificent thought process, more and more as you read the poem. I believe this gives the reader some self-fulfilling inspiration while they continue to read the poem over and over. “Who made the swan, and the black bear?” (2). A swan is such a gentle, relaxing creature that has a calm image in peoples mind. A bear on the other hand, is ferocious and fierce amongst its enemies. This question all points back to what you believe in. Why would a God that loves you so much create such a dangerous creature that you have to coexist with, or does this prove that...
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