The "Study Buddy"

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Timothy Brown

The “Study Buddy”
The use of stimulants is rapidly increasing in our society as another form of a study aid for teenagers, adults, or even younger kids diagnosed with Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) or narcolepsy. Teenagers as well as adults are using Adderall to help them concentrate on papers, study for big tests, or simply to just stay awake. Unfortunately, this stimulant that increases the activity in your brain has several side effects both mentally and physically. Adderall has become a problem on college campuses, and is beginning to be abused by people with and without prescriptions for this drug. People around the world need to be aware of the dangerous side effects and abuse connected with Adderall misuse. Doctors and Professors continue to examine and educate the illegal use of Adderall in college institutions, the NFL, and other locations where illegal consumption of Adderall is an increasing problem. Adderall is a stimulant drug that contains a combination of mixed amphetamine salts that are used to improve attention span by releasing adrenaline in order to make the brainwork faster and more efficiently. (Drugs A-Z). There are two main types of Adderall available on the market, Adderall instant release and Adderall extended release (Adderall XR). In 1996, Adderall was make available for the first time by a British pharmaceutical manufacturer. In August 2004, Adderall XR was designed to give a double-pulsed delivery of amphetamines to have a longer affect throughout they day. Both types of Adderall enter your immune system in four ways. The four ways of consuming Adderall include swallowing, parachuting, snorting, and plugging. The normal or intended way of taking Adderall is supposed to be done orally. However, many people may want a more intense “high”. Therefore, there have been many cases when college students take lower doses of Adderall by absorbing it through their rectal membrane or nasal cavity to increase the effect. The effect is determined also by the amount of Adderall consumed. Adderall comes in dosages ranging anywhere from 5-60 milligrams a day depending on the severity of ADD diagnosed. ADD has become an important issue among American youth. “Approximately 9.5 percent of Americans ages 4-17 were diagnosed with it in 2007, or about 5.4 million children, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.” (Schwarz 1) The problem is that millions of kids, college students, and adults illegally take prescribed Adderall for their own personal reasons. A researcher and professor from the University of Kentucky accomplished an incredible discovery about Adderall and other stimulants that are improving kids’ test scores and overall focus throughout the study day. 30% of students at the University have illegally used a stimulant, like the ADD drugs Adderall or Ritalin. The numbers increase with upperclassmen. Half of all juniors and seniors have used the drugs, the study found, and 80% of upperclassmen in fraternities and sororities have taken them. (Cooper 1) Adderall is classified as a Schedule II drug, a category of drugs considered to have a strong potential for abuse or addiction but that also have legitimate medical use. Included are opium, morphine, and cocaine. (Drugs A-Z) Americans all over the United States illicitly taking Adderall are jeopardizing their futures because of the dangerous side effects linked to a single pill.

A research survey was done in 2008 with 1,811 students at a public Institution in Southeast United States over the topic, Adderall. Only four percent of the students had a legitimate prescription and, surprisingly, 34% of the students claimed to have used a type of Adderall illegally. The next part of the survey questioned the students whether or not they believed the Schedule II amphetamine was a health risk. “Only 2% thought they were “very dangerous.” 81 percent thought that the illicit use of ADD medication was either “not dangerous...
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