The Stations of the Brigade System

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The Stations of the Brigade System

Now that we have examined some of the various cooking techniques and flavors that may be found around the world (and hopefully stimulated your curiosity to learn more), let’sconclude this chapter by returning to France to examine one of the greatest influences theFrench have had on modern kitchens: the brigade system.As we mentioned earlier, in the 1800s Escoffier developed the brigade system used inmost large commercial kitchens today. You will encounter the job titles and descriptionshe developed (in both English and French) in job ads and on the job in commercial kitchensin the United States, Canada, and other Western nations, so it is helpful to be familiar withtheir meanings.It is important to understand that, in the culinary industry, the word chef  does not mean cook . In French, chef  means “chief” or “boss.” The title chef  is used for those kitchen posi-tions that carry some management or training responsibility and require a certain degreeof skill and experience. Aworker with no supervisory responsibilities is called a cook .Table 1-1 lists the titles and job responsibilities you might find in a modern kitchen.Obviously, the jobs and duties vary depending on the size and nature of the operation, aswell as the country in which the restaurant is located, but this list provides a good basisfor what you may encounter.In addition to the managerial chefs, there are the station chefs or chefs de partie (par-TEE) who are responsible for particular production areas. Table 1-2 lists and describesthese titles. You will see both the English and the French titles in the industry

 

 
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