The Spirtual Comfort of Nature in Williams Wordsworth’s

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  • Topic: Wye Valley, Tintern, River Wye
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  • Published : February 5, 2012
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THE SPIRTUAL COMFORT OF NATURE IN WILLIAMS WORDSORTH’S

“LINES COMPOSED A FEW MILES ABOVE TINTERN ABBEY”
 

The spirituality and influence of nature in William Wordsworth’s "Lines

Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey," explains the impact of and comfort

provided by nature throughout his life. As Wordsworth grows older, he tries to share this

with his sister. Using the moon as a metaphor for his older (evening) stage in life, he tells

her “Therefore let the moon Shine on thee in thy solitary walk;” It is as though he is

saying that if you are one with nature, you are never alone. Wordsworth shares with his

sister that even though he can no longer physically participate with the beauty of nature,

that his mature, adult mind still finds comfort in childhood memories; and it can do that

same for her. He explains to her that even when he is far from the Abbey, he can still see

and hear and feel the beauty of nature. He reflects upon his memories to help him

maintain perspective and peace in everyday life. Because he finds spirituality and

meaning through nature, both in his reflections on his youth and in how he experiences

nature as an adult, he believes it will also be essential to the spiritual well being of his

sister, even after he has left the earthly world.

Support Paragraph one about memories: "wild ecstacies shall be matures Into a sober pleasure"; Thy memory shall be a dwelling place for all sweet sounds and memories the absolute happiness and recollection of pleasant emotions

The speaker wants Dorothy to experience nature the way that William experienced it five years ago. He wants her to have the same "wild ecstasies" (138) that William did. That way, when Dorothy "mature[s]" (138) the way he did, her "pleasure" in nature will become "sober" (139), too – just like the speaker!

Just as the "beauteous forms" (22) stayed alive in the speaker's memory after William's boyish "bound[ing]"...
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