The Sociology of Discrimination

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I. Background of the Study

1. To know what is discrimination and its types or forms 2. To know the reasons why people discriminate
3. To have a full understanding as to the relation between discrimination, prejudice, and stereotype.

A. Interview or Survey
B. Library Research
C. Searching through Online materials

II. Review of Related Literature
Article 2 Section 11 of the Philippine Constitution: The Declaration of Principles and State Policies The State values the dignity of every human person and guarantee full respect for human rights. [De Leon, Hector. (2008 ed.). Philippine Constitution] A human person is a being and not a thing, he is entitled to respect, not because he is right or wrong but because he is human. In a democratic state, the individual enjoys certain rights which cannot be modified or taken away by the lawmaking body. These rights are protected or guaranteed because of the belief in the inherent dignity and basic moral worth of every human person, regardless of race, color, creed, origin, or station of life. Implied in this principle or policy is the recognition that the human person is the end and purpose of every social organization, the State included. Prejudice is a cultural attitude that rests on negative stereotypes about individuals or groups because of their cultural, religious, racial, or ethnic background. Discrimination is the active denial of desired goals from a category of persons. A category can be based on sex, ethnicity, nationality, religion, language, or class. More recently, disadvantaged groups now also include those based on gender, age, and physical disabilities. Prejudice and discrimination are deeply imbedded at both the individual and societal levels. Attempts to eradicate prejudice and discrimination must thus deal with prevailing beliefs or ideologies, and social structure. There is ample evidence that prejudice and discrimination are social constructions. If indeed prejudice and discrimination are inherent in the human condition, we would not be able to account for intermarriage and assimilation among highly differentiated human groups. There is, moreover, considerable evidence that prejudice is absent in young children (e.g. Allport, 1954). There is a consensus that Prejudice and Discrimination constitute a learned behaviour Social Discrimination is the prejudicial treatment of an individual based solely on their membership in a certain group or category. Discrimination is the actual behaviour towards members of another group. It involves excluding or restricting members of one group from opportunities that are available to other groups. A Stereotype is a generalization about a person or group of persons. We develop stereotypes when we are unable or unwilling to obtain all of the information we would need to make fair judgments about people or situations. In the absence of the "total picture," stereotypes in many cases allow us to "fill in the blanks." Our society often innocently creates and perpetuates stereotypes, but these stereotypes often lead to unfair discrimination and persecution when the stereotype is unfavorable. Stereotyping is a type of discrimination. When a person is stereotyping they are thinking in terms of inflexible categories, and is linked to the psychological mechanism called displacement. Displacement is when one feels feelings of hostility or anger toward objects that are not the origin of those feelings. Many people blame scapegoats for problems that are not their fault. This is common when two deprived ethnic groups compete with one another for economic rewards. This is normally directed against groups that are relatively powerless, because they make an easy target. It frequently involves projection, which is the unconscious attribution to the others of ones own desires or characteristics


Whether people would...
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