The Roman Government

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The Roman Government
Latin Investigation By Abhishek Gambhir
January 2013

The High School of Glagow

abhishekgambhir14@gmail.com

1.

Table of Contents
3. 4 5. 6. 7. 8. Introduction The Leaders Political Groups Monarchy to Republic Conclusion Bibliography

Curia Julia The High School of Glagow abhishekgambhir14@gmail.com 2.

Introduction
I have chosen the government for my latin investigation for many reasons. The first and formost reason is that I am very interested in modern politics and how the government works and I thought it would be interesting if I resarched how the romans ruled and governed their country. On the front cover you will see an ancient coin with the letters SPQR on it. This would have stood for “Senātus Populusque Rōmānus” Which literarly translated as “The Senate and People of Rome.” These four letters were one of the most important symbols in roman life it was used as an official emblem of the modern day town of Rome. It appears on coins, at the end of important documents ,gravestones and was branded on the arms of the men in the Roman legions.

SPQR on a Gravestone

SPQR on a the base of a statue of Julius Caeser

In the Table of Contents I hve incuded remains of the Roman senate houses. The one on the left is Curia Julia which was the third senate house to be named. It’s construction began in 44 BC by order of Julius Caeser but was interupted by his unfortunate assassination and was completed by Caesar’s successor Augustus in 29 BC. The Curia Julia is one of the only Roman structures to still be standing today. Throughout the Investigation I will look at different points abot what made the Roman government tick, compare it with modern times and give a personal response. So lets begin with....

The High School of Glagow

abhishekgambhir14@gmail.com

3.

The Emperor

The Leaders

The emperor was the general learder of Rome and was responsible for the city. I will be using Emperor Augustus as an example. The reign of augustus started on 16th January 27 BC. This marked the start of a new era known as the Pax Romana (The Roman Peace). By conquering Egypt, Dalmatia, Pannonia, Noricum, and Raetia, Augustus dramatically expanded the Roman emprie. Beyond the frontiers, he made peace with the Parthian Empire. He reformed the Roman system of taxing, developed networks of roads with an official courier system, established a standing army, established the Praetorian Guard(a force of bodyguards for the emperor), created official police and fire-fighting services for Rome, and rebuilt much of the city during his reign. Augustus died in 14 AD at the age of 75. He may have died from natural causes, although there were rumors that his wife Livia poisoned him. He was succeeded as Emperor by his adopted son Tiberius who can be seen at his feet in the statue.

The Prime Minister

Statue of Emperor Augustus

As a comparison I will be talking about the Prime Minister. The Prime Minister, unlike the Roman emperor is bound to “cabinet responsibility” (making joint decisions). In Latin Prime Minister is “Primus inter pares” which means “first among equals. But something the Prime minister and the emperor do have in common is the secutrity. Only other politicians and close friends and family are allowed on downing street.

Response
The way the Leader operates in there two civilisations is very different. Personally I think that our way of handling things is a bit better because in todays day and age, without the proper security assassination would be common and countries would be thrown into chaos.

The High School of Glagow

abhishekgambhir14@gmail.com

4.

Political Groups
The Roman Senate
The Roman Senate was a political organisation in ancient Rome. The word senate derives from the Latin word senex, which means "old man". Therefore the word means “assembly of elders”. The senate was one of the most enduring establishments in Roman history. The Senate was founded...
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