The Role of Woman in Today’ Society.

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The role of woman in today’ society.
Where to start? For thousands of years, women (in cultures dominated by men) were subservient to men. There are a few exceptions where the lineage of a family was traced on the mother's side, surnames came from the mother, etc. However, the lineage in most cultures generally follows the male line of the family. In some cultures, women worked side-by-side with men. In the Anglo-Saxon period of England, women often fought alongside the men. In many very old and traditional cultures women are seen as second-class citizens. The old adage of women "barefoot and pregnant" still exists today in some areas of the world. Women are not allowed to make major decisions in the family and are expected to submit in all things to the husband; they cannot own anything, and they are not permitted to go to school. This is certainly the way things were in England hundreds of years ago, where women could not (historically) inherit money or property, or if they did, it was forfeited to the husband when the woman married. Widows might not marry again just for this reason. Today, at least in England, women are on a more equal footing with men in most cases: often by necessity, where women can now take up posts that were once traditionally given to men (as a doctor’s license for example). In other countries, women still are treated without proper value. There still do exist men who would not shake my hand because I was a woman. However, more than ever, opportunities in becoming educated, serving in medicine, politics, news reporting—in fact, most career opportunities—are open to women almost all over the world. For example things have changed a great deal over the last three hundred years in the USA —even since women won the right to vote near the beginning of the twentieth century, and equal opportunity legislation was passed just past the middle of the twentieth century.
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