The Role of the Broadcast in Amultilingual Community: a Study of Edo Broadcasting Service Radio and Television Indigenous Programmes

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ROLE OF THE BROADCAST MEDIA IN A MULTILINGUAL COMMUNITY: A STUDY OF EDO BROADCASTING SERVICE TELEVISION AND RADIO INDIGENOUS PROGRAMMES

BY

ORIFAH SAMSON OBADUN

IN PARTIAL FULFILMENT OF THE REQUIREMENT FOR LAC 724
(APPLIED COMMUNICATION SEMINAR)

CO-ORDINATORS:
Dr. B.A. LANINHUN
Dr. N.M. CHRISTOPHER
Dr. O.O. OYEWO

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATION AND LANGUAGE ARTS
UNIVERSITY OF IBADAN

JUNE 19, 2012
ABSTRACT
The use of indigenous languages by the media generally cannot be over-emphasized in an era tagged information and communication age. The roles of the broadcast media, to a large extent, depend on the socio-cultural context. Those of monolingual community might in practice differ from those of a multilingual context. The roles of the broadcast media in such an environment coupled with the low literacy level and the drive towards communication for all-round development far outweighs those of the print media. This work aims at looking at the roles of the broadcast media-radio and television- in a multilingual, and by implication, a multicultural, context by investigating the languages of Edo state and those indigenous programmes designating such languages, the issues covered by such programmes and time allotted them plus the factors impeding the broadcast of such indigenous programmes. This was done through survey, interview, observation and analysis submitting that more efforts need be intensified in the use of indigenous languages and cultures by the broadcast media in a multilingual community in our quest for socio-cultural, scientific, economic, political and information and communication development drive. Key Words: Role, Broadcast media, indigenous programmes and multilingualism

INTRODUCTION
Studies have really shown that Canada in 1979 through its OMNI 1 & 2 radio/TV programmes broadcast in about 40 languages while Ghana Broadcasting Corporation is currently running programmmes only in Ghana local languages. Radio Ghana, too, is broadcasting in six local languages and Toronto-based OMNI 1 & 2 are also broadcasting in over 40 languages. More so, Sidney Head listed over 175 African languages used in radio broadcast in 1973 observing that over a thousand African languages are not heard on the radio or television. This observation, perhaps, explains vividly the predicament of Nigerian languages in the media. However, the broadcast media in Nigeria promote linguistic and cultural imperialism in our society even in the face of recent media policy demanding 60% of local content broadcast. The media, therefore, have been alleged of role of cultural alienation, disorientation and disruption of our people from their cultures and languages and consequently, lack of access to adequate information and participation, resulting in recent clarion calls, on one hand, for the preservation, sustenance, promotion and utilization of indigenous languages and cultures of our people in order to achieve rapid political, economic and socio-cultural change and development in our country and, on the other hand, applying a multidisciplinary approach to achieving this charge. Still, much of the studies in respect of the above in this part of the country have dwelled extensively on looking at the effects of multilingualism and multiculturalism or multi-ethnicities as partly responsible for cultural imperialism. However, this study attempts to look at the role of the Edo state broadcast media in the face of multilingualism, multiculturalism and multi-ethnicities bringing out the significant roles of the broadcast media in the multilingual setting.

PURPOSE OF THE STUDY
This study aims at achieving the following:
1. Examining the language situation in Edo state.
2. Examining the...
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