The Role of Marketing - Public Relations

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DMA 501
Marketing Management

Marketing Public Relations (MPR)
The Institute of Public Relations defines Public Relations as "... the deliberate, planned and sustained effort to establish and maintain mutual understanding between an organisation and its publics". The words deliberate, planned and sustained are crucial here, as companies cannot hope to "do a bit of PR" in isolated bursts and hope for the type of results which come from a more concerted effort. Because public relations is involved with more than just customer relationships, it is often handled at a corporate level rather than at the functional level of marketing management and it can be difficult to integrate public relations fully into the overall promotional plan.

Prof. Kibera defines Public Relations as “a firm’s communications and relationship with its various publics, who include the organisation’s customers, employees, stockholders, the government the general public, and the society in which the firm operates”. Public Relations activities are designed to build or maintain a favourable image for an organisation and favourable relationship with its various publics

Can be defined as a non-paid for communication of information about an organisation, product/service, idea, person, etc; generally in some form of media.

The publics of marketing public relations
MPR is aimed at numerous groups, in addition to customers:
➢ Employees: It may be important to communicate with employees on such issues as job security, working conditions and the state of the market. ➢ Customers: These may be all those people who consume the organisations’ products or use the organisations services. ➢ Suppliers: these may need assurances that a company is a credible one to deal with and that contractual obligations will be met. ➢ Intermediaries: these may share many of the same concerns as customers and need reassurance about a supplier’s capabilities. ➢ Government agencies: in many cases, actions of government can significantly affect the fortunes of an organisation ➢ The financial Community: Shareholders - both private and institutional - form an important element of this community and must be reassured that the organisation is going to achieve its stated objectives. ➢ Local Communities: it is sometimes important for an organisation to be seen as a "good neighbour" ➢ Other Publics: prospective investors, stockholders, labour unions,

The characteristics of Marketing Public Relations
Marketing Public Relations is an indirect promotional tool whose role is to establish and enhance a positive image of an organisation and its products among its various publics. Some of the more important characteristics of Public Relations are: 1. MPR is effective in building awareness and brand knowledge, for both new and established products. 2. MPR is generally a relatively low cost form of communication: The Company does not pay for the space or time obtained in the media. Apart from nominal production costs, much public relations activity can be carried out at almost no cost, in marked contrast to the high cost of buying space or time in the main media. It pays only for a staff to prepare / develop and circulate the stories and manage certain events. Body Shop for example has spent very little money on advertising; its success has been almost entirely due to publicity. 3. It has more credibility than advertising: MPR carries more credibility than advertising; consumers are five times more likely to be influenced by editorial copy than by advertising. This can occur because the audience may regard a message as coming from an apparently impartial and non- commercial source. 4. MPR efforts can be targeted: public relations activities can be targeted to a small specialised audience if the right media vehicle is used. 5. It is difficult to control: a company can exercise little direct control over how its public...
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