The Rise of Coffee Houses and Journalism

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  • Topic: Newspaper, Coffeehouse, Coffee
  • Pages : 4 (1389 words )
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  • Published : September 8, 2010
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CLC: The Rise of Coffee Houses and Journalism
Once upon a time when there was no “Starbucks”; with the rise of the restoration in England, along came a trend following war and plague of renewed need and interest in reading, but little money to pay for the material. As printed matter became more readily available, most English people still could neither read nor write as late as the beginning of the 18th century (PBS, 2001). The first newspaper ran from 1702 to 1735; a "one-sheet," publication offered in London; “The Daily Courant”. The Courant and many others, found an increasing audience because of mass printing via the invented press which led to upwards of eight daily newspapers in publication in London by the century's close (2001). In the 1700s, books were extremely costly; hand bound, and had limited availability. Short episodic stories which evolved into novels as we know them, materialized between 1715 and 1755; the achievement of four professional London writers, including Daniel Defoe with his Robinson Crusoe and Moll Flanders, Samuel Richardson, with Pamela, Tobias Smollett's Humphrey Clinker and Roderick Random, and Tom Jones by Henry Fielding. Practicality and realism was what the 17th century journalism was all about. However, Alexander Pope; an author who added an alternate style to writing when he authored “The Rape of the Lock” This mock epic about a cutting of hair satirized the traditional epic poems of the period. The natural sciences gained interest through actual “hands on” research and the public’s curiosity was aroused. The “Books of Wonders” of strange but true topics became popular, as well as spooky stories of vampires, monsters, criminals, and terror. This ignited “Bloods and Thrilling Shockers”; eight page gory and violent novels in serial form were sold for a penny per copy (2001). Among the popular “Penny Dreadful” writers were Michael Anglo, “Penny Dreadful and Other Victorian Horrors”, and Henry James, “The Turn of the...
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