The Rise and Fall of the Constitution

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 85
  • Published : February 7, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
The Rise and Fall of the Constitution
There were many factors that contributed to the eventual failure of the Union. One of the major controversial topics during this time period was slavery, because it was opposed by the North, but accepted by the South. Along with these disputes came rapid expansion of the United States. This “Manifest Destiny” only inflated many issues in an already divided country. However, when the nation searched for a solution in the Constitution, all that was found was more confusion. As a result of the confusion, many people were able to create disputes against the nation’s backbone. Because of this, one can assume the Constitution led to the eventual destruction of the nation it was trying to protect. The Constitution was a major factor to the start of the Civil War and sectional discord. Some people stated that some people stated that the Constitution did, in fact, acknowledge slavery and that slave states should have a choice in whether to bring slavery into new territory. However, others suggested that slavery had the potential to destroy the “equilibrium” that could have protected the Constitution. This created the belief that the two regions (the North and the South) could coexist. These ideas led to the belief that it would be constitutional for the South to secede. (Documents B, D, and E)

Another flawed area in the Constitution that led to the destruction of the Union was slavery in newly found territories. The Constitution never provided a set “boundary” on the limits of slavery. This problem essentially forced laws in order to “clean up the mess” slavery had left behind. The Dred Scott case further illustrated the frequent changes in slave laws stating slaves were “private property” and can be taken into any territory legally. Popular sovereignty later was later established and allowed Democrats to expand slavery, despite the North’s objection. Another significant change in slave laws came when the...
tracking img