The Rise and Fall of Indigenous Business Development Center in Zimbabwe.

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The Rise and Fall of the Indigenous Business Development Center (IBDC) in Zimbabwe.

Tamuka Charles Chirimambowa

Submitted in Partial fulfillment of the
requirements for the degree of
Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Economic
History and Development.

University of KwaZulu-Natal.
Durban, 2006.
Abstract
Economic reform has become one of the major necessities of post-colonial African states, given years of slavery, apartheid, colonialism and underdevelopment. Many scholars have argued that Africa’s lack of development is due to the lack of African participation within the economic sphere, especially as a business class or ‘bourgeoisie’. They contend that African participation in business has been rare, and where granted it has been mostly within the peripheries or petty commerce. This study will investigate Zimbabwe’s IBDC with a view to going some way to answering the major question that arises out of this argument: is creating a nationalist indigenous entrepreneurial class the answer to Africa’s development problems? The focus of this study will be on the emergence of the IBDC as a vehicle for black empowerment. It will attempt to account for its successes, its failures, and its ultimate demise. The research will also chart how some of Zimbabwe's most successful black entrepreneurs, some who have managed to establish a global presence, got their start with this organization, and how they proceeded when the IBDC ceased to exist.The study will also proceed to examine the Indigenous Business Women's Organization and the Affirmative Action Group, similar organisations that came after the IBDC. Crucial within this research agenda is the interrogation of the role of the state in post colonial Africa: can it be a catalyst for economic empowerment, or is it an inhibitor? Finally, efforts will be made to investigate the complementarities and contradictions of efforts to create a black business class with poverty alleviation policies.

Contents

Chapter 1: Post Colonial Period……………………………………………………….7 Chapter 2: First Decade of Independence……………………………………………..13 Chapter 3: Rise and Fall of the IBDC…………………………………………………22 Chapter 4: Empowerment for whom? ...........................................................................34

Introduction.

This paper, which takes as its main object some aspects of the emergence of the Indigenous Business Development Center (IBDC)[1] in Zimbabwe, attempts to posit the Rise and Fall of the IBDC historical, by contextualizing those developments from factors that gave to, rise and demise, within Zimbabwe’s political economy from the colonial period of the 1920s, proceeding to the first decade after independence until up to the- Formation of the IBDC (1989) till its demise (1993-5) and the present (2006).

Therefore, in order to understand the development of the IBDC, it is imperative that we posit the conditions that gave rise to the need for indigenization within the context of the generic political economy. Such a feat enables us to appreciate the multifarious factors influencing and surrounding the four actors involved namely: i. The State

ii. Institutions-Interest or pressure groups.
iii. Individuals
iv. Market

The relations amongst these factors become of paramount importance specifically the power relations and at times the ‘bifurcation’[2] that existed, and how these impacted upon each other, giving rise to a love-hate relationship. This attempt is limited by time and space constraints, and as such any assumption or endeavour it to fully articulate the history of the IBDC is ‘void abnitio’. The aim of this dissertation is then, to illuminate or paint a picture on the power plays underpinning the history of the IBDC in Zimbabwe perceived as an institution and individuals, from a historical perspective, trying to establish parallels and trends, that gave to the rise, ultimately the fall and the aftermath.

Methodology
The study thus takes a structural...
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