The Relationship Between the Us and North Korea

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The Relationship Between the United States and North Korea Is it Really as Volatile As We Think? The relationship between the US and North Korea has been fraught with tension for many years. This paper explores the history of the relationship while discussing possible causes for the tension.
12/4/2006
Introduction

How many have ever felt abandoned or bullied? Ever feel both from the same person over a long period of time? Did you ever try to resolve those issues with the other person? Were you told the person may not have realized they were treating you in such a manner? Who would be truthful, you with your feelings or that person giving these responses? Both of you are truthful, as each of you sees it.

In this speech, I am going to use the goings on between North Korea and the United States to show that truths are relative to our frame of reference, starting first with a little history into the relationship, followed by examples of actual activities that are interpreted by different viewpoints based on the experiences each person has had. I will conclude with the interpretations I have made about the current events.

Main Points

1 Treaties: Agreements to be friends

Kim Young-Sik, Ph.D. "A Brief History of the US-Korea Relations Prior to 1945"

October 21, 2006 http://www.kimsoft.com/2003/us-kr-relation.htm

On March 24, 1882, was signed a treaty known as the Chemulpo Treaty of Amity and Trade , the first article of which loftily proclaims - "Corea and the United States of America hereby establish everlasting amity and friendship between the two peoples."

The Treaty involved more than friendship and fair trades: it was in effect a mutual defense treaty.

The Taft-Katsura Agreement was signed on July 29, 1904. Japan agreed to accept the US presence in Hawaii and the Philippines, and in exchange, the United States agreed to nullify the Chemulpo Treaty and to give Japan a free hand in Korea. When the agreement was signed, Japanese troops were already in Korea in large numbers and the US military had neither the will nor the power to expel the Japanese from Korea.

In my opinion, the treaty was dropped because the USA felt fear at Japan's great power at the turn of the century.

Once Korea found out they had been traded, they must have felt abandoned and helpless for when they sought help from the USA they were told:

President Theodore Roosevelt's official stance was: "The Korean Government was in the position of an incompetent defective not yet committed to guardianship. The United States is her only disinterested friend-but has no intention of becoming her guardian.... We cannot possibly interfere for the Koreans against Japan. ... They could not strike one blow in their own defense."

This was only one example, namely the first experience, Korea had with feeling abandoned and let down by our fine government. There would be several more over the next several years.

2 Current Events:

William Drozdiak "Clinton's Star Wars Plan Undermining US Arms Control Goals" Washington Post Thursday, June 15, 2000 October 21, 2006

VIENNA-

"This American search for a perfect security environment only heightens the sense of insecurity for the rest of us," said a senior European diplomat. "In the end, any missile defense system in the United States will only provide a pretext for other nations to build more sophisticated offensive weapons. So ironically, even for the United States, the result will be less security."

The reasons people get scared is because of what we see and how we interpret it. For example, with examples...
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