The Red Baron

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: Manfred von Richthofen, Lothar von Richthofen, Pour le Mérite
  • Pages : 2 (775 words )
  • Download(s) : 102
  • Published : May 11, 2005
Open Document
Text Preview
Although to most people it may just be a brand of good tasting pizza, The Red Barron was actually a German fighter ace of World War I. His full name was Rittmeister Manfred Albrecht Freiherr von Richthofen, who will be referred to as von Richthofen for simplicity's sake. By the Germans, he was called "der rote Kampfflieger" (The Red Battle-Flyer), the French called him "le Diable Rouge" (Red Devil), and in the English-speaking world he is known as "The Red Barron." In a time of ancient aircraft technology when twenty air victories insured a pilot legendary status, von Richthofen had eighty victories, and he is still considered even today as the ace of aces (The Red Barron). As a child, von Richthofen was privately tutored until his ninth year of schooling. He then attended school in Schweidnitz and became a cadet. After his schooling, he began his military career as a cavalryman in the 1st Regiment of Ehlans. When he received his epaulettes and became an officer in the fall of 1912, his father bought him his own horse with which von Richthofen became a talented contender in jumping and cross-country racing (Perry). Unfortunately, warfare in the twentieth century had little use for mounted cavalry as the invention of machine guns had led to trench warfare (The Red Barron). When the war started, von Richthofen was posted near Verdun as a messenger carrying dispatches between units and climbing into and out of the trenches along the front. When given orders to rummage around the countryside for food for the troops, Richthofen replied, "My dear Excellency! I have not gone to war in order to collect cheese and eggs, but for another purpose" (Perry). Exasperated by his attitude his superiors finally let him transfer to the German Air service in May of 1915 (Perry). Von Richthofen began his career as an observer for other pilots. He never considered becoming a pilot himself because the training took three months, and he was sure the war would be over...
tracking img