The Punishment Should Match the Criminal

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The Punishment Should Match the Criminal.

In the oldest written legal code “an eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth” is the general rule regarding punishment for crimes committed. The punishment should match the crime. Today, our criminal justice system contains this same basic principle: the severity of the crime generally matches the severity of the punishment in terms of number of years served, fines imposed or community service hours required. It’s time to throw out the Hammarabi Code and modernize. An updated legal code should be based on the question “whose committing the crime?” The United States prison system is in need of dramatic overhaul because our prisons are overcrowded and inhumane. In determining how to deal with a criminal, the criminal justice system should, when possible, examine the root cause of the crime and determine whether it is due to 1) substance abuse, 2) mental illness or disability, or 3) natural instinct. Because of the great impact the media has on people, there should an agency that reviews, and limits programs/movies that induce criminal activity. By basing our criminal system on such categorizing and controlling the media, we will better be able to rehabilitate those who are substance abusers, medically treat those who are mentally ill or disabled, and imprison those who are naturally  criminally inclined.  

Some prisons should be set up as rehabilitation centers and use proven techniques to give prisoners the best chance they have of overcoming addiction and becoming productive members of society. Statistics show that 70% of incarcerated criminals are substance abusers. By simply imprisoning those with a drug or alcohol problem, we are not fixing the problem. Prisons can be dangerous and only provide a further education in the criminal life. Often times diet; education, and fitness play an important role in freeing one from addiction. Today, the United States has some drug courts that are offering chances of...
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