The Plague

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  • Topic: Black Death, Disease, Pandemic
  • Pages : 2 (511 words )
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  • Published : September 28, 2010
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In “This is the End of the World’ The Black Death” by historian Barbara Tuchman, provides readers with detailed images of the plague that completely eliminated one third of the population in Europe. Tuchman illustrates the symptoms of the victims in a colorful dynamic manner. She also talks about the different aspects in which the poor and rich were affected by disease (555-557). The plague affected the whole population and the massive numbers of deaths changed the life of the citizens in Europe. The essay portrays the plague with its pandemic destruction as a chaotic troubled and afflicted society with no hope for a future.

Tuchman meticulously details the muck and filth [people seldom bathed] in which the diseases’ symptoms affected the body. Symptoms such as: black markings on the skin indicated internal bleeding; swellings oozing blood and pus were common among the infected ones (548). Tuchman writes “As the disease spread, other symptoms of continuous fever and spitting of blood appeared instead of swellings or buboes” (549). The plague had two forms in which it manifested. One spread by contact and the other was spread by air (549). If both forms of the plague attacked the body at once, the result was a speedy death, sometimes within hours.

The “Black Death” spared those who could afford its treatment. Tuchman states, “Flight was the chief recourse of those who could afford it” (555). As in modern society the wealthier can afford more privileges, thus the elite fled to their far away secluded country homes. On the other hand, the poor lived in urban close quarters [like a burrow], which made them more vulnerable to infection (555) Therefore, the ignorance and poverty level caused the lower class to suffer the greatest in deaths.

Oblivious of a solution to the plague, hopelessness and despair ruled the life of most citizens. In some towns more than half of its inhabitants died of the disease. Almost everyone accepted death. . . . (Tuchman 552). Not...
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