The Pianist

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 351
  • Published : May 14, 2005
Open Document
Text Preview
‘The Pianist' is a film directed by Roman Polanski and based around the life of Wladyslaw Szpilman during the Nazi invasion of Poland. Roman used visual techniques in the opening scenes such as black and white film, camera positioning and motifs to create an atmosphere for the audience.

The first scene in the film is a montage of grainy black and white scenes of Polish life before the Nazi invasion on Poland. The footage shows a dated world with old English style building and technology, people are shown walking about the town in aged clothing. The grainy dated look of the film also makes the scenes appear gloomy but relaxed at the same time. These images are used to drive the notion that it is set in a time long ago, in a different era. This scene is a critical part in the film as it refines the time and emotion, in which the film is set, so the audience can relate better to the characters and what is happening to them.

Wladyslaw Szpilman is shown in almost every scene at the beginning of the film. This helps us get a better understanding of Szpilman as we can see how he reacts to the situations he gets placed in. When the Szpilman family got notices of rules they would react to the situation and do what they could. Most of the time Wladyslaw was shown in the centre of the scene and things would happen around him. This shows us that Wladyslaw was strong willed and single minded as he resisted the controls of the Nazi. He does not want to leave his home during the invasion which also tells us that he was a dedicated to is country and would not give in that easily to the Nazis. These scenes are important as the show Wladyslaw's character in depth.

Midshots are used through out the most of the opening scenes in the film. Roman used this type of shot while the family was packing up to move out of Warsaw, listening to the radio, and arguing about what to do with the valuables. These shots were used for those scenes as it gives the audience a wide shot of...
tracking img