The Old Man and the Sea - Comparison Between the Book and the Film

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After having read the Hemingway's "Old Man and the Sea" as a book in class, we also watched the film which was made afterwards because of the story's enormous popularity. As always, there are some ways in which the book differs from the film as well as the fact that they have several things in common.

Taking into consideration that this novel was Hemingway's last desperate attempt at breaking through after all his previous narratives flopped I thought that the film might be different from the movie indeed because he might've wanted to bring the story into perfection in this way. Also I assumed it to be very boring to spend a whole film showing how one single man overcomes his mental and physical problems and eventually manages to catch a huge marlin and take it home; thus that there were other, new events involved for more variety and that things which were pushed into the background in the book now were more striking fore extra depth. For example, a new role, flashbacks and different storylines would make the film more interesting.

From these suggested improvements you can conclude that I consider the book to be a bit longwinded because there are actually very few events taking place: the long fight against the marlin before it dies and then the numerous shark attacks to the fish which the old man can't avert. Anyhow, at mental point there's a lot to enjoy: every time when Santiago faces a new problem to cope with he thinks of lions on the beach (which represent him when he is young and strong and could overcome any challenge), the great softball player Di-Maggio in whom he has faith (he wants to be just as strong as him) or about the young boy (Manolin) in his home-village (he wants him to be with him so he can help). All those memories of his youth, idol and helper make the story more interesting because in this way you get an idea of his norms and values and what his life now and in the past looked like. This corresponds to Hemingway's life, so he...
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