| the Occurrence of Osmosis and Diffusion in Artificial and Living Cells

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 204
  • Published : June 29, 2011
Open Document
Text Preview
|
The Occurrence of Osmosis and Diffusion in Artificial and Living Cells | David Michael|
March 24, 2011|
Partners: Fady Guirguis, Klaus Blandon, and Mauricio Rodriquez.| |

* Table of Contents
I.Abstract3
II.Introduction4
III.Materials and Methods9
IV.Results15
V.Discussion18
VI.Works Cited23

*

Abstract
This lab focuses on the understanding of osmosis and diffusion in a practical sense. It allows the conductor to see what factors affect diffusion and osmosis. This report was written to explain and present the results gathered in a precise and organized manner. This experiment was divided into two parts. The first part concentrated on the placing potato cylinders in different sucrose concentrations for a period of time. This part was conducted to see if the potato cylinders would gain weight or lose weight because of osmosis. The second part was conducted to see if a dialysis bag, filled with sodium sulfate and starch solution and placed in an albumin/glucose solution, would contain albumin/glucose from the outside or the albumin/glucose solution would contain any sodium sulfate/starch from the inside. The first part of this experiment there is a relationship between the amount of sucrose concentration and final mass. As the sucrose concentration increased the mass of the potatoes decreased. This is a result of the sucrose molecules not being small enough to pass into the membrane of the potato cylinders, but the water was able to change to a different concentration gradient. As the sucrose amount increased the free water molecules decreased, which as a result did not allow the water molecules to enter the potato cylinders. On the contrary, no diffusion of solutes occurred in part two of this experiment. Osmosis, on the other hand, did occur. Water moved into the dialysis bag, thus increasing the bag’s weight. Diffusion did not occur because of the size of the pores in the dialysis bag. The solute molecules were too large to diffuse while the water was able to diffuse because it was smaller. The results gathered for this experiment report the direct factors that affect osmosis and diffusion. The concentration of solute was the factor that affected first part of this experiment. The molecule and pore size were the factors that affected the second part of this experiment. Introduction

This experiment was conducted to learn the processes of diffusion and osmosis. The conductor learned the process through two experiments. The conductor then measured the osmosis of water in and out of the cells of the potato. The first experiment was conducted using an artificial system. In this experiment the conductor measured the diffusion of solutes and osmosis of water in and out of the dialysis tube. This first part of the experiment was the artificial system. Diffusion is defined as the net movement of like molecules or ions from an area of high concentration to an area of low concentration (Keith, Messing, & Schmitt, 2010). Diffusion is a process that requires no energy. The difference in the concentration of the adjacent regions in the process of diffusion is called the concentration gradient. The concentration gradient can be used to see where the most potential energy. The potential energy is stored in the molecules before they move (High Concentration). The concentration gradient can also be used to locate the kinetic energy of diffusion. The kinetic energy is released when the molecules move (Low Concentration). Molecule always moves down a concentration gradient (High to Low).

High Concentration
High Concentration

* Low Concentration
Low Concentration

Water diffuses just like any other substance. Water will move from areas of high concentration to low concentration. The water moves from high concentration to low concentration when there is a difference in the solute concentration in the membrane or when the solute molecules are too large to move across...
tracking img