The Oak Ridges Moraine

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  • Topic: Water, Toronto, Greater Toronto Area
  • Pages : 2 (525 words )
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  • Published : March 21, 2007
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The Oak Ridges Moraine

The Oak Ridges Moraine is one of the most significant landforms on Southern Ontario that was formed 12,000 years ago by moving glaciers. The moraine is hydrolically and regionally. It forms the northern boundary of the Toronto boreregion. The moraine is the headwaters of 65 river systems, and 35 of them are in the GTA. The moraine has numerous streams, woodlands, wetlands, kettle lakes, kettle bogs, flora and fauna. It is one of the of the few remaining continuous green corridors in southern Ontario. Many species and creatures live in the moraine since thirty percent of it is still forested. It is likely that the moraine will become more and more affected by urbanization over the next couple of years, and if nothing is done to prevent this from happening, we will lose a highly significant part of Ontario

The moraine's greatest threat is land development, urbanization. Millions of people live near the moraine. The moraine is being threatened by development pressures. Because of urbanization, the moraine is getting smaller and smaller. There has been evidence that in several areas of the moraine, the acquifers are being mined. Water is being taken from the moraine too soon in order for it to be naturally replenished. In several areas of the moraine, groundwater has been severely contaminated by numerous sources. The industrial, agricultural, residential and septic systems are damaging the moraine's groundwater. Groundwater provides forty percent of the water in Ontario's rivers and streams which makes them more likely to change in water flows and purity. The attractive forests and hilly relief attract developers that are looking for building opportunities. The thousands of houses that are yet to be built in the moraine, substitute the two-million square feet of water. If supplies keep getting exhausted, streams will dry up and this will affect fisheries, wildlife and conservation.

Fortunately, the Toronto City Council is working...
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