The Negative Effects of Teenage Dating

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The Negative Effects of Teenage Dating
Sean D. Foster
Bellevue University

The biggest threat about teenage dating is their inability to maintain a relationship. Teenagers mostly, do not understand the necessity of sustaining a relationship over a period of time. Therefore, frequent break ups and arguments lead to attempts of suicide, teenage pregnancy, STD’s, teen violence, and substance abuse. This happens due to lack of experience and a broader understanding of what relationships are (Dasgupta, 2011). The problems of teen dating involving violence, sex, drug and alcohol abuse, and suicide are primarily caused by stressful life events, peer influence, and failure of parents to take their children away from harmful activities. Teenage dating deals more with exploring their new-found youthfulness than exploring the extent of love. This makes them reduce a relationship to the concept of possessing a boyfriend or a girlfriend making them lose sight of what is important. This is why we have more cases of teenage dating than cases of everlasting friendship. Most teenagers lack the proper understanding of balancing friendship and dating causing even best friends to grow apart. This also implies increasing isolation with their new found boyfriends or girlfriends making them further unavailable and unexposed to potential friends in their immediate circle (Dasgupta, 2011). Teenagers experience pressures every day. Not only are they undergoing unnerving biological changes, but they also are transitioning from childhood to adulthood. Dating teenagers experience even more pressure as they focus on building a relationship in the mist of all these changes (Armsden and Greenberg, 1987). Substance Abuse:

A link exists between teen dating and substance abuse, according to a 2004 study conducted by The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University. The study found that teenagers who spend 25 or more hours a week with a girlfriend or boyfriend are more likely to abuse substances. Compared to teens who spend less than 10 hours a week with a girlfriend or boyfriend are more likely to abuse substances. Compared to teens who spend less than 10 hours a week with a girlfriend or boyfriend, these teens are two and a half times more likely to drink, five times more likely to get drunk, four and a half times more likely to try marijuana and two and a half times more likely to smoke. The study also revealed that girls who date boys two or more years older than them are more likely to drink alcohol, try marijuana and smoke (Mack, 2010). Teen Dating Violence:

Unhealthy relationships can start early and last a lifetime. Dating violence often starts with teasing and name calling. These behaviors are often thought to be a “normal” part of a relationship. But these behaviors can set the stage for more serious violence like physical assault and rape (Mack, 2010). What is dating violence?

Teen dating violence is defined as the physical, sexual, or psychological/emotional violence within a dating relationship, as well as stalking. It can occur in person or electronically and may occur between a current or former dating partner. You may have heard several different words used to describe teen dating violence. Here are just a few: . Relationship Abuse

. Intimate Partner Violence
. Relationship Violence
. Dating Abuse
. Domestic Abuse
. Domestic Violence
Adolescents and adults are often unaware that teens experience dating violence. In a nationwide survey, 9.4 percent of high school students report being hit, slapped, or physically hurt on purpose by their boyfriend or girlfriend in the 12 months prior to the survey (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2011). About 1 in 5 women and nearly 1 in 7 men who never experienced rape, physical violence, and or stalking by an intimate partner, first experienced some form of partner violence between 11 and 17 years of age (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2010)....
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