The Myth of Computers in the Classroom

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 1217
  • Published : April 11, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
English W131 (R.D.)
January 30, 2013

A Critique on “Unplugged: The Myth of Computers in the Classroom”
David Gelernter is a professor of computer science at Yale University. Gelernter is a leading figure in the field of human cognition and a seminal thinker in the field known as parallel computing. In his article “Unplugged: The Myth of Computers in the Classroom” Gelernter thinks that improper or uncontrolled use of computers may lead to decline in literacy and lack of basic skills.

Computers could easily be known a teacher’s best friend, but if abused and overused, computers can also be harmful to the learning process overall. Today, computers are being used in the learning process in schools. From grade school, kids are being taught to use computers in their day to day academic studies. This is why many students now learn to type before they learn to write in cursive. Gelernter thinks that improper or uncontrolled use of computers may lead to decline in literacy and lack of basic skills. Computers have the ability and potential to accomplish great things. And Gelernter agrees that “Computers should be in the schools.”(186) Using the right software, computers have the power to attain a rewarding learning experience.

Computers and the internet have changed the world of education in numerable ways. Gelernter explains how computers in the schools can be a negative source, when it comes to learning. Technology in schools provides as inconvenient decline on learning, this is because technology can provide answers for students instead of allowing the students to work at getting the answers themselves. Most students now have access to countless sources of information from all over the world. They can also talk to experts in multitudes of professions. Multimedia and hypermedia’s use of sound pictures and videos may have enhanced the learning process by making it more entertaining. What’s the point of learning to read if a computer can do...
tracking img