The Music Industry in the Digital Age

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The Music Industry in a Digital Age

Table of Contents

* Report Justification

* Summary

* Introduction

* Main Body

* Conclusion

* Bibliography

Report Justification

As multimedia students we have become accustom to the changing technology around us. We are always at the forefront of fads and changes. In terms of music most people carry around with them an ipod or some form of mp3 player. In 2006 46.6 million ipods alone were sold by Apple. In the same year illegal downloads skyrocketed to 6 billion, a 47% increase from the previous year. The available of free music and the move to mp3 players show that there will soon no longer be any room for cd’s. Sadly this means that analog artwork will also be lost, unless artists provide a different means to gaining their artwork.

This particular topic is of interest to us as we have seen the transformation of the music tape, to cd’s and now mp3. Even back when tapes were popular people were still getting music for free. It was so easy to record songs off the radio onto tape. Perhaps as humans it was inevitable that we would always find a way of getting products for free. It seems like the music industry is constantly changing and remains a very large part of our digital culture. Here Is a poll we took on facebook to find out just how many people are still buying physical copy’s of their music.

A total of 50 people took this pole. Only 2 people answered that they still buy vinyl, the same for buying cd’s and for downloading illegally. So a huge 88% of people are downloading illegally. They commented on using such torrent sites such as isohunt and piratebay. Some people said they download directly off youtube using various youtube to mp3 converters. Some people download off soundcloud. This is where artists upload their own music and can choose whether or not to make it a free download for people.

Summary

The digital age has redefined the nature of work for many people the world over. The online revolution has changed the way we communicate, shop and seek entertainment. One industry that has been most effected by this is the music industry. From it’s beginning the music industry it has faced many new technologies that threatened its existence. With the invention of the phonograph in 1877 musicians feared that people would be discouraged from attending live performances. Record companies feared that the introduction of music radio would kill record sales and in with the advent of the cassette in the 80’s it was not uncommon to see “Home taping is killing music” in magazines ads. With each technological innovation, music became more accessible and more lucrative than ever. By 1999 the music industry had become a $15 billion a year giant. This would be the last time the music industry would see such profits.

Music is alive and well, even if the music industry is not. More people than ever before are listening to music, research shows that music consumers of today do not spend less money on music compared to a decade ago, they simply spend that money differently, attending to more live events and music festivals than purchasing physical or virtual music.

The knock on effect of digital music has made the music industry change its business model. Before the internet a hand full of large corporations controlled the industry, piping heavily marketed recordings by superstar artists through a few radio chains and MTV to the public.

Introduction

In this report we are highlighting the fact that we no longer have to pay for music. Even small artists will know the effects of this once they put a song up on youtube. We will address this issue at the expense of the artists who aren’t getting any income from their music being downloaded. At our own faults we are loosing out on what comes with the album. We no longer get the artwork, the lyrics and often we do not play the album in the sequence it was intended for. The...
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