The Most Beautiful Man in the World

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  • Topic: World, Emotion, Public Radio International
  • Pages : 4 (1352 words )
  • Download(s) : 1793
  • Published : January 27, 2007
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The most beautiful man in the world is not a movie that would raise profound questions about the meaning of life or the lack of it. What it does is however to recreate an ordinary day of a little girl's life into a lyrical tale about her awakening, both metaphorically and objectively, for the world around her. In less than six minutes, this movie reveals with beauty and pure understanding the intimate world of children in which every little detail of living is experienced with sincerity, depth and the seriousness of a great event. The director, Alicia Duffy implies a truth of her own that is waiting to be read and sensed both through the visual language and clarity of this short film, and the aesthetic precision with which each shot is crafted. The enigma about the most beautiful man in the world is slowly approached and exposed through the evocative use of diagetic sound, visual imagery, and narrative simplicity. The ultimate key toward a more thorough discernment of this rather ambiguous and mysteriously beautiful movie is strongly implied in the title. For whom is the male protagonist in this film the most beautiful man in the world and why are the two questions that propel the film's narrative and aspire imagination. An atmosphere of suspense is created with the very first read of the title of the movie. The viewer is provoked and is left in anticipation to the very end of the movie. The most challenging answers come unexpectedly and in small packages. In this case, the prologue scene of the movie shows a close up of a little girl yawning while watching in front of the television screen. Her eyes do not sparkle with childish enthusiasm but blink with apathy and tiredness instead. The tight frames of the shot along with the murky lighting of the room suggest nothing but physical as well as emotional captivity. The typical for most children playfulness, vitality, and passionate emotionality are all restricted within the limited space of her home. The closed...
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