The More We Know Others, the More We Know Ourselves.

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The more we know others, the more we know ourselves.

Within the lives of every individual there are groups of people who associate with them, who help to give them a deeper understanding of who they are. These groups can stem from friendships, hobbies, family, culture or even age. Some argue that it would be impractical to say that an individual gains and develops their identity through the actions and opinions of others. However, it is evident that without the presence of other people, one would not be able to form a complete sense of self. Others help a person discover their origins and heritage, as well as aid them in realising their own morals and desires, as well as being illustrations that show the difference and similarities between them and the individual in question. For these reasons, there can be no doubt that the more knowledge a person has about others, the more they understand their distinct self.

One group that every person shares a connection with is their family. Whether or not one agrees with them in regard to their opinions, actions or beliefs, they still play a significant part in forming identity. Gaining and understanding of one’s family and culture can help that person to discover their heritage. This can also grant a sense of individuality to those who feel too common or ‘plain’. In Growing up Asia in Australia, this issue is explored through Kylie Kwong’s anecdote about her return to her family’s country of origin. She felt an instant sense of belonging and inclusion as she discovered her ancestral history, showing that uncovering knowledge about one’s relatives will strengthen the connection between them and their cultural or ethnic ancestry. In turn, this connection aids an individual in becoming sure of who they are and where they come from. Without a link to family history, one can feel lost, because they do not feel like part of a cultural group. Ivy Tseng’s story within Growing up Asian in Australia shows that a lack of...
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