The Minoan Civilization

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The Minoan Civilization lives were very peaceful. The government did not turn their back on the poor but they actually looked out for their less fortunate people. Women were not treated as minority but as equals. The kind ruled his people inspired by the grace of the God’s (Mahdavi, 2012). The king also shared his governing powers with priest and the bureaucrats. They took great pride in their art work which glorified their kings, pharaohs and the prominent members of their household (Mahdavi, 2012). Crete was a very convenient stop for merchants for the reason being that it had access to the entire Mediterranean Sea. They were able to forge vibrant societies with limited natural resources that touched the lives of people beyond their homeland, initially spreading their writing system, extended their complex political structure, cherished art as well as passed on their architectural style to other civilizations (Mahdavi, 2012). The Classical Age Athens was more military like mentality. Cities and towns that had been destroyed led to political entities to inhabit much smaller and enclosed areas for protection (Mahdavi, 2012). They did not have a king but they did have a council, and the head of council had a title equivalent to the title of a king, they met in a great hall to discuss all political, military and judicial matters (Mahdavi, 2012). They did not look after the poor the way the Minoan Civilization did, on the contrary there was constant tension between the wealthy and the less fortunate. The core of their civilization was their citizen assembly. Mostly adult men that 32 years old and older, the prepared laws for discussion, debated ideas and reported findings to a full council. This cause a division between classes of people, only men of military age were considered citizens the wealthy were the only that could occupy governmental offices and the middle class citizens could vote, but the poor could not (Mahdavi, 2012). Personally I would rather have...
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