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The Maker's Eye: Revising Your Own Manuscript

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The Maker's Eye: Revising Your Own Manuscript

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In Mr. Donald Murray's composition, "The Maker's Eye: Revising Your Own Manuscript", he writes about the process in which many writers take in revising and editing their work. In doing so, he tells the writers that they must be a critical reader and non-bias of his/her work. He focuses on the recursive process of writing a well-written paper. He believes that, "[a]fter a draft is complete, the writing process can begin (44).

Mr. Murray begins by discusses Peter F. Drucker method of a "zero draft" and how the writer should begin counting drafts after the first draft is complete. He explains how many writers feel, that after the first draft is completed it then can be edited to say what is exactly meant. Murray explains how we need to be critical readers and when editing. He states, "[w]riters must be their own best enemy" (44).

He says a writer must be able to accept the good with the bad. When they edit he says this process can often be difficult so, he refers to Ray Bradbury who puts his work away and looks at it a year later with "new eyes" and then is able to more effetely edit and revise his work. Murray explains that, "[t]he writer must learn to read critically but constructively, to cut what is bad, to reveal what is good" (45). He discusses that most writers do not understand how much writing and rewriting goes into a great piece of work. He expresses how this can be a disadvantage to amateur writer when they only complete one or two drafts.

Mr. Murray also includes in his essay the process of editing. He mentions information and meaning. He suggests that a writer must have sources and know what is important in each. He also speaks of the audience and knowing whom you are writing for. While including those Mr. Murray also brings up form, how your paper goes with the audience, and structure, to which your papers framework is built on. Mr. Murray states that many "writers … spend a majority of their time [on the] development." The author also brings up...

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