The Love and Hate in Wuthering Heights

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The Love and Hate in Wuthering Heights

Shi Xueping

Introduction

Wuthering Heights, the great novel by Emily Bronte, though not inordinately long is an amalgamation of childhood fantasies, friendship, romance, and revenge. But this story is not a simple story of revenge, it has more profound implications. As Arnold Kettle, the English critic, said," Wuthering Heights is an expression in the imaginative terms of art of the stresses and tensions and conflicts, personal and spiritual, of nineteenth-century capitalist society.” The characters of Wuthering Heights embody the extreme love and extreme hate of the humanity.

1.1 Introduction of the auther

Emily Jane Bronte was the most solitary member of a unique, tightly knit, English provincial family. Born in 1818, she shared the parsonage of the town of Haworth, Yorkshire, with her older sister, Charlotte, her brother Branwell, her younger sister, Anne, and her father, the Reverend, Patrick Bronte. All five were poets and writers; all but Branwell would publish at least one book.

Fantasy was the Bronte children's one relief from the rigors of religion and the bleakness of life in an improverished region; they invented a series of imaginary kingdoms and constructed a whole library of journals stories, pomes, and plays around their inhabitants. Emily's special province was a kingdom she called Gondal, whose romantic heroes and exiles owed much to the poems of Byron.

Brief stays at several boarding schools were the sum of her experiences outside Haworth until 1842, when she entered a school in Brussels with her sister Charlotte. After a year of study and teaching there, they felt qualified to announce the opening of a school in their own home, but could not attract a single pupil.

In 1845 Charlotte Bronte came across a manuscript volumn of her sister's poems. She knew at once, she later wrote, that they were "not at all like the poetry women generally write... they had a peculiar music-wild, melancholy, and elevating." At her sister's urging, Emily's poems along with Anne's and Charlotte's, were published pseudonymously in 1846. An almost complete silence greeted this volume, but the three sisters, buoyed by the fact of publication, immediately began to write novels. Emily's effort was WUTHERING HEIGHTS; appearing in 1847, it was treated at first as a lesser work by Charlotte, whose JANE EYRE had already been published to great acclaim. Emily Bronte's name did not emerge from behind her pseudonym of Ellis Bell until the second edition of her novel appeared in 1850.

In the meantime, tragedy had struck the Bronte family. In Septermber of 1848 Branwell had succumbed to a life of dissipation. By December, after a brief illness, Emily too was dead; her sister Anne would die the next year. WUTHERING HEIGHTS, Emily's only novel, was just beginning to be understood as the wild and singular work of the world.

1.2 Introduction of the story

The beginning of the story was Mr. Lockwood’s visiting of Wuthering Heights. His amazement of Heathcliff's surliness and curiosity of beautiful Catherine's rudeness urged him to listen to a very strange and frightening love story from Nelly Dean. In the summer of 1771 Mr. Earnshaw brought home an orphan later called Heathcliff he had found in Liverpool. This waif was persecuted by young Hindley, but deeply loved by his daughter Catherine. So there was contradiction between Hindley and Heathcliff since childhood. After the death of their parents and his own marriage, Hindley treated Heathcliff as a servant, but this was relieved by the pleasant times with Cathy.

On one of their expeditions they reached Thrushcross Grange where she stayed as the Linton’s guest for several weeks. When she returned to the Wuthering Heights, she was altered a lot: she had been deeply attracted by the dress, luxury of the Lintons, especially the handsome and gentle Edgar Linton. Although...
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