The Lost Generation

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 1083
  • Published : March 11, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
1
English

The Lost Generation (1920-1929)

During the 1920's a group of writers known as "The Lost Generation" gained popularity. The term "the lost generation" was created by Gertrude Stein who heard her auto-mechanic while in France said that his young workers were, "une generation perdue". This referred to the young workers' poor auto-mechanic repair skills. Gertrude Stein would take this phrase and use it to describe the people of the 1920's who rejected American post World War I. The three best known writers among The Lost Generation are F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway and John Dos Passos. Others are: Sherwood Anderson, Kay Boyle, Hart Crane, Ford Maddox Ford and Zelda Fitzgerald. Ernest Hemingway, perhaps the leading literary figure of the decade, would take Stein's phrase, and use it as an epigraph for his first novel, The Sun Also Rises. Because of this novel's popularity, the term, "The Lost Generation" is the enduring term that has stayed associated with writers of the 1920's. The "Lost Generation" defines a sense of moral loss or aimlessness apparent in literary figures during the 1920s. World War I seemed to have destroyed the idea that if you acted virtuously, good things would happen. Many good, young men went to war and died, or returned home either physically or mentally wounded (for most, both), and their faith in the moral guideposts that had earlier given them hope, were no longer valid...they were "Lost." Zelda Fitzgerald is one of the famous authors of this time and wrote many books and story’s his famous book is bits of paradise. Witch has many great stories in it.

Work Cited
http://www.montgomerycollege.edu/Departments/hpolscrv/jbolhofer.html http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0856588.html
tracking img