The Livelihood Impact of the Smallholder Oil Palm Scheme in Ghana

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  • Topic: Palm oil, Oil palm, Palm kernel
  • Pages : 15 (5045 words )
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  • Published : March 31, 2011
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KWAME NKRUMAH UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
INSTITUTE OF DISTANCE LEARNING
COMMONWEALTH EXECUTIVE MBA PROGRAMME
RESEARCH METHODOLOGY - CEMBA 570 ASSIGNMENT
RESEARCH PROPOSAL
NAME OF STUDENT: ROBERT DAMOAH ARTHUR
EXAM NUMBER: PG4093410
CENTRE:TAKORADI
TOPIC:
THE LIVELIHOOD IMPACT OF THE SMALLHOLDER OIL PALM FARMERS’ SCHEME IN GHANA – A CASE STUDY OF THE BENSO OIL PALM PLANTATION (BOPP) LTD, ADUM BANSO ESTATE – TAKORADI.

…………………………………… …………………………….. ROBERT DAMOAH ARTHUR HENRY MENSAH
(STUDENT) (SUPERVISOR)

DATE………………………………. DATE……………………….

TABLE OF CONTENTS

UNIT PAGE
Cover Page 1
Table of Contents2
Abstract3
1.0 Background of the study4
2.0 Problem Statement5
3.0 Objectives of the study6
4.0 Hypothesis7
5.0 Literature Review8
5.1 Brief History of the Oil Palm Tree8
5.2 Overview of the Oil Palm Development in the world9
5.3 Overview of the Oil Palm Development in Ghana11
5.4 BOPP Smallholder Oil Palm Farmers’ Scheme14
5.4.1 Brief History of the BOPP Smallholder Scheme14
5.4.2 Agronomic Practices and Yield Profile15
5.4.3 Services provided by BOPP to Farmers16
6.0 Methodology17
7.0 Relevance of Study17
8.0 The Scope of the Study18
9.0 Limitations of the Study18
10.0 Plan of Work19
11.0 References21

ABSTRACT
The biodiversity and climate consequences of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) expansion across the world has received considerable attention. The human side of the issue, highlighted with reports of negative livelihood outcomes and rights abuses by oil palm companies, has also led to controversy. Oil palm related conflicts have been widely documented in Indonesia, the world’s leading producer, yet uptake by farmers has also been extensive. An assessment of the livelihood impacts of oil palm development, including sources of conflict, is needed to shed light on the apparent contradiction between these reports and the evident enthusiasm of farmers to join the oil palm craze thereby informing future expansion. Conflicts between communities and companies have resulted almost entirely from lack of transparency, the absence of free, prior, and informed consent and unequal benefit sharing, and have been exacerbated by the absence of clear land rights. This research is aimed at coming out with some recommendations to improve the present situation and foster the establishment of smallholder friendly production regimes. Oil palm expansion in Ghana, especially the area under study is set to continue. If environmental standards can be raised and policy interventions targeted at the broader social impacts of land development this expansion may be achieved to the significant benefit of large numbers of rural smallholders.

1.0 BACKGROUND OF THE STUDY
The Elaeis guineensis, or oil palm is a perennial tree and long yield, and it can grow up to 30 meters. Oil palm plants have bright male and female flowers which bear fruits by the thousands. Its fruits are round, ovoid or elongated in shape which make up compact bunches weighing between 10-40 kgs. Before ripening, palm fruits are dark purple, almost black, and when they become ripe under a tropical sun turn a bright, colorful orangey-red color. Inside each fruit is a single seed, the kernel or palm kernel, protected by a woody endocarp or shell which is surrounded by a fleshy mesocarp or pulp. Both the pulp and kernel produce large quantities of oil. Two types of oil are produced, palm kernel oil from the kernel and the palm oil extracted from the pulp. The stem of the palm tree is straight and the plant forms the shape of an inverted cone. Young palms have rough, jagged stems. Later older palms have smoother stems but have scars left behind as some...
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