The Life of Mary Shelley

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 159
  • Published : March 7, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
The Life of Mary Shelley.

Mary Shelley is most commonly known for being the first science fiction writer, even contrary to popular beliefs that Frankenstein in particular wasn’t essentially fit for a Science Fiction Genre, and people often spoke of how she couldn’t have possibly have written such a remarkably bold gothic novel, due to the fact that she was a woman. The idea for her very first, and most well-known novel Frankenstein first came to Shelley in a dream, but after putting her ideas to paper, Frankenstein had its very foundation pulled out and re-adjusted until it was deemed fit with moral and religious standards of the time, in order to be released to the public. In the 1800’s, women didn’t have much power in society, which meant Shelley, who created the novel at the surprisingly young age of 18, had to publish it anonymously. The public and the government felt that Frankenstein had too many moral flaws and that the idea for one man to play the role of God, then leaving his ‘child’ to fend for itself, without nurture, was completely absurd. Shelley also faced many life issues such as depression and loss, but she still succeeded in writing one of the most remarkable, well known Gothic novels in history, and then went on to write many more novels, but even so, not without harsh ridicule that Frankenstein received. The initial idea for Frankenstein first came to Shelley in a dream. In 1818, the idea that life could be created through light energy was widely discussed and research on the topic was at peak. Previously, Shelley had been associating herself with a group of friends to help with her depression that she had developed during the mourning process of three of her children, and they often talked of the new research- this is consequently how the idea of Frankenstein came to be. Shelley described her dream with detail, "When I placed my head upon my pillow, I did not sleep, nor could I be said to think... I saw - with shut eyes, but acute mental...
tracking img