The Kite Runner

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The Kite Runner

By | November 2012
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The movie interpretation of the novel The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini was an engaging visual illustration of the book. The movie was able to convey the characters from the novel, and portray them with appealing personalities. The novel and film had significant differences in plot changes, characterization, and in scene changes that made the novel in broad-spectrum a superior selection.

In the novel, Amir has trouble adopting his nephew Sohrob and bringing him back to America with him. They spend over a year dealing with the Embassy and Adoption services in Pakistan and America due to the lack of birth and death certificates, which proved who the guardian of Sohrob was. During this time, Sohrob and Amir bond emotionally with each other and are able to connect almost as a father to son relationship. In the film, Amir and Sohrob are immediately able to return home to America without any trouble. The book’s interpretation of Sohrob’s adoption and journey to America was better than the movie’s because it allows the characters to connect emotionally with each other within the story to the reader.

The film wasn’t able to develop the personalities and relationships between the characters as fine as the book did. A significant change was that there was no mentioning of Hassan’s gypsy mother who disappears and reappears in his life. In the novel, Hassan’s mother’s past caused Hassan to be viewed by the public as the son of a women filled with shame and sins. Hassan is bullied by the other children in the city because of his mother’s wrong doings. Since the movie did not mention his mother, he was never bullied or looked down on for his family’s history. Hassan’s mother appearing in the novel made the book superior compared to the movie because her troubles given to Hassan allowed the reader to understand the culture of the society during that time period.

A major scene that was cut and removed from the movie was when Soraya and Amir discovered that they were...