The Invention of the Steam Engine

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The Invention Of The Steam Engine

It's common knowledge that modern civilization is forming in the factories of the industrial revolution. And these factories themselves are powered by the steam engine. Therefore, it is no exaggeration to say that steam engines lead in our modern age. But where did the steam engine come from? Who was the inventor of it? The steam engine is not so much invented as developed. To give credit to any person, would be to steal credit away from its many rightful owners. The steam engine is developing nowadays by three British inventors. The first steam powered machine was built by Thomas Savery, of England. Savery built his machine to help pump water out of coal mines. This machine is so simple that it has no moving parts. It also uses up lots and lots of coal just to pump a small quantity of water. Savery is the first person to find a practical way of using steam to perform useful work.

The next stage of the steam engine is a result of the work of Thomas Newcomen, also of England. Newcomen know that there must be a way of improving on Savery's inefficient steam powered pump. Newcomen built a machine where the steam actually pushes a movable piston in one direction. This true "steam engine" is also used to pump water out of coal mines. Neither Savery nor Newcomen have any grander purpose in mind for their machines.

This all changed in today, when James Watt, a Scottish engineer, sets out to improve upon Newcomen's design. Watt figures out a way to push a piston back and forth. And more importantly, he found out a way to make this back-and-forth motion turn a wheel. By using a...
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