The Insurable Interest Doctrine

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 203
  • Published : January 17, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
 
 
 

The Insurable Interest Doctrine: What is it? 
And What Does It Mean? 
 
Evan B. Sorensen, Esq. 
Kenne J. Zielinski, Esq. 
 
Tressler LLP

The Insurable Interest Doctrine |  1 
 

The Insurable Interest Doctrine: What is it? And What Does It Mean?   
 
While  one  cannot  define  an  insurable  interest  with  complete  certainty  or  precision,  in  general  it  exists  when  the  policy  holder  derives  pecuniary  benefit  or  advantage  by  the  preservation  or  continued  existence  of  the  property  or  will  sustain  pecuniary  loss  from  its  destruction.1   In  other  words,  the  insurable  interest  doctrine  requires  a  person  or  entity  which  holds  an  insurance  policy  to  have  some  significant  interest  in  the  property  insured  by  the  policy.2    Traditionally,  the  insurable  interest  requirement  has  been  very  broadly  read  and  interpreted  with  almost  any  interest  being  found  to  create  an  “insurable”  interest.   This  article  will explore the origins of the insurable interest doctrine following its migration from England to  the  United  States,  examine  why  the  doctrine  is  important  in  the  commercial  coverage  context,  examine  current  trends  and  issues  in  determining  the  insurability  of  commercial  interests,  and  finally  discuss  whether  inter‐related  but  unnamed  entities  could  potentially  have  an  insurable  interest. 

 
I. 
Common Law and the Origins of the Insurable Interest Doctrine:   
 
Insurance  law  has  long  required  that  policyholders  possess  an  insurable  interest  in  the  property  which  they  seek  to  insure.3    Essentially,  the  insurable  interest  requirement  typically  functions  as  a  safeguard  to  an  insurer  allowing  the  insurer  to  justify  nonpayment  after  a  covered occurrence has taken place.   If the insurer can successfully prove the insured lacked an  insurable interest in the property, a court will hold the insurance contract is void on grounds of  public policy.  So one may ask, where did the insurable interest requirement originate?  And on  what grounds is an insurance contract void if an insured lacks an insurable interest?   

 
Although the insurable interest doctrine has long been a commonplace in American law,  its  true  origins  date  back  to  the  18th  century  in  England.    In  1746,  the  English  Parliament  outlawed  gambling  contracts  on  marine  insurance.4    And  subsequently  in  1774,  Parliament  extended this gambling prohibition to life insurance contracts as well.5  Accordingly, the original  purpose  of  the  doctrine  was  Parliament’s  attempt  to  curtail  the  use  of  insurance  contracts  as  a  vehicle  to  gamble  on  ships  and  lives.   To  achieve  Parliament’s  purpose,  the  Acts  sought  to  void  contracts  which  lacked  an  insurable  interest.6   While  the  Acts  of  1746  and  1774  prevented  the  use  of  insurance  contracts  as  a  means  of  wagering  on  ships  and  lives,  the  two  laws  fell  short  in                                                               1

 See, e.g., Delk v. Markel Am. Ins. Co., 81 P.3d 629, 636 (Okla. 2003).  2
  While  this  article  focuses  on  insurable  interests  in  the  property  context,  the  breadth  of  the  insurable  interest  doctrine  extends  well  beyond  the  property  arena.   For  example,  the  insurable  interest  doctrine  thrives in the life insurance arena as well.  

3
 See, e.g., Connecticut Mut. Life Ins. Co. v. Schaefer, 94 U.S. 457 (1876).  4
 Act of 1746, 19 Geo. 2, c. 37 § 1 (Eng.). 
5
 Act of 1774, 14 Geo. 3, c. 48, § 1 (Eng.). 
6
 Id. 
The Insurable Interest Doctrine |  2 
 

precisely  defining  an  insurable  interest—so  the  task  was  left  to  the  King’s  Bench  to  articulate.7   As such, English case law defined the contours of an insurable interest and spawned the debate  as  to  whether  an  insurable  interest  must ...
tracking img