The Inner World of a Future Mental Health Counselor

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The Inner World of a Future Mental Health Counselor

2 Welcome, you are about to embark on a journey into my inner world. Along the way, you will discover the following: (1) what in my background helps me to think through and identify what is right and wrong, as well as what constitutes ethical professional behavior; (2) my ethical decision-making style. My unique style of ethical decision making which reflects my early and ongoing experiences with moral values and issues which has been influenced and shaped by my parents, relatives, peers and valued adults in my life such as teachers and mentors; (3) individuals that have most impressed me and serves as a role model for me; (4) and my current developmental status and how it has and will likely impact my work as a counselor. I therefore invite you to dive into my world and may your life never be the same. Growing up in a Christian environment, I was raised to have my “…perceptive powers trained to distinguish both right and wrong.” (Hebrews 5:14) In short, I received moral values made up of strongly held beliefs based on the Bible, along with a conduct that conforms to those beliefs.

Early on, as an adolescent, I began to take a close look at the Holy Scriptures and have come to appreciate that the Bible’s counsel is based on Godly wisdom, which is far superior to human thinking. I regard the Bible as trustworthy and relevant to life in our modern world. II Tim 3:16,17 states: “All Scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness, so that the servant of God[a] may be thoroughly equipped for every good work.” While many in the world may be lost, God’s word has helped me to think through and identify what is right and wrong, as well as what constitutes ethical professional behavior.

Like any little girl growing up in America, I grew up being influenced by cultural and 3 societal forces to embrace strategies to bolster my self-esteem. Quite a number of these strategies are of dubious worth, and others are actually dangerous and self-defeating. There came a point in my life when it was crucially important for me to embrace the idea that I am responsible for my own healing. Friends and family can surely provide support and certainly be a remedy for the ache of a lonely heart; however, they cannot be the cure that will erase past experiences that may have fostered feelings of doubt and inadequacy. Each of us has areas of vulnerability, and to some level, we all nurse old hurts. I have grown to realize that I was burdening myself with excessive expectations, which led me to feel disappointed and resentful. Mistakes are a fact of life, and we develop as we learn from them. Learning from past mistakes prevents repeated mistakes. Having such knowledge will not only help a person develop to their fullest potential and have a clearer perspective, but may help guide another person along the way.

I believe that the clearer one is about what one values and believes, the happier and more effective one will be. The assumptions we make about ourselves, about others in the world and about how we expect things to be – how we think things really are, what we think is really true and what therefore expect as likely consequences that will follow from our behavior. I have come to appreciate that many of the limitations one faces in life are self-imposed. What you believe about yourself can keep you locked behind your fears or thrust you forward into living your dreams. "We are what we think," taught Buddha. "Change your thinking, change your...
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