The Influence of Nouvelle Cuisine Towards Today's Gastronomy

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  • Topic: Cooking, French cuisine, Food
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  • Published : April 11, 2011
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FACULTY OF HOTEL AND TOURISM MANAGEMENT

UiTM MALAYSIA

LEARNING AND TEACHING CULINARY ARTS

(HTC 775)

THE INFLUENCE OF NOUVELLE CUISINE TOWARDS TODAY’S GASTRONOMY

PREPARED BY:

PUTRI DAHLIA AB RASHID2010279074

NOOR SALIZA SALMI2010412854

MASTER IN GASTRONOMY (HM775)

PREPARED FOR:

ASSOCIATE PROF. DR. ARTINAH ZAINAL

DATE OF SUBMISSION

25 MARCH 2011

Table of Contents Page

1. Introduction3

1.1 Definition3

1.2 History3

2. Characteristics of Nouvelle Cuisine5

3. The Influence of Nouvelle Cuisine7

3.1 Technical Innovation7
3.2 Cuisine Developments7
3.3 Healthy Foods8
3.4. Celebrity Chefs8
4. Conclusion9
References10

1. Introduction
As far as the cookery tools and equipment had evolved through years and centuries, the French cuisine also deals with great evolution over time. The chefs were always in search of new products and new aromas, and kept looking for new techniques (Cengage, 2003).

1. Definition
Nouvelle cuisine is a French term which means “new cuisine”, which actually refers to an approach to cookery and food presentation used in French cuisine. Unlike classical cuisine, an older form of French haute cuisine which recognized with elaborate style of cooking and service, nouvelle cuisine in contrast, is characterized by lighter, more delicate dishes with an increased emphasis on presentation (Wikipedia, 2010). In addition, according to Larousse Gastronomique (2009), Nouvelle cuisine is a movement in cookery started in 1972 by two food critics, H. Gault and C. Millau, with the aim of encouraging a simpler and more natural presentation of food. The movement combined a publicity campaign with novel recipes and a new ethic, although the idea itself was not new.

2. History
The term nouvelle cuisine has been used many times in the history of French Cuisine. For instance, Vincent La Chapelle’s, Franҫois Marin’s and Menon’s works in 1940s was described as nouvelle cuisine. Even in 1880s and 1890s, Georges Auguste Escoffier’s cooking was also described with the term.

However, the modern usage of the term are attributed to two French journalist and food critics, Henri Gault and Christian Millau to describe the cooking styles invented by a goup of French Chefs, namely Paul Bocuse, Micheal Guérard, Jean and Pierre Troigros, Alain Chapel, Louis Outhier and a number of others who were the students of Fernand Point (1897-1955), a French restaurateur in Vienne, France.

Nouvelle cuisine was developed during the 1960s and become popular in 1970s. It emphasized on freshness, lightness, and clarity of flavour (Britannica Online, 2011). The food served also stressed on greater simplicity and the dishes are created elegantly. Mennel (1996) stated that there are five principles behind this new cooking movement (nouvelle cuisine). The principles are total freshness of ingredients, lightness and harmony in all components and accompaniments, the use of the basic and simplest cooking methods, and types of presentations. The movement was made visible and championed by Gault and Millau in their magazine Guide Gault et Millau, and other gastronomic guides.

According to Larousse Gastronomique (2009), supporters of nouvelle cuisine reject the over-rich, complicated, and indigestible dishes that are no longer suitable to a health conscious generation who aware of the risks of overeating, especially of fatty foods, which had been recognized leading to obesity and cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, they adopt authenticity and simplicity in cooking to counter those diseases and the increasing usage of processed food. The nouveaux cuisiniers also seek to uphold a concept that combines the professions of medicine and dietetics. Their guiding principles in nouvelle...
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