The Indian Cuisine

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INDEX
1 History

1.1 Antiquity

1.2 Middle Ages

2 Ingredients

3 Regional cuisines

3.1 Andaman and Nicobar Islands

3.2 Andhra Pradesh

3.3 Arunachal Pradesh

3.4 Assam

3.5 Bihar

3.6 Chandigarh

3.7 Chhattisgarh

3.8 Dadra and Nagar Haveli

3.9 Daman and Diu

3.10 Delhi

3.11 Goa

3.12 Gujarat

3.13 Haryana

3.14 Himachal Pradesh

3.15 Jammu and Kashmir

3.16 Jharkhand

3.17 Karnataka

3.18 Kerala

3.19 Lakshadweep

3.20 Madhya Pradesh

3.21 Maharashtra

3.22 Manipur

3.23 Meghalaya

3.24 Mizoram

3.25 Nagaland

3.26 Odisha

3.27 Puducherry

3.28 Punjab

3.29 Rajasthan

3.30 Sikkim

3.31 Sindh

3.32 Tamil Nadu

3.33 Tripura

3.34 Uttar Pradesh

3.35 Uttarakhand

3.36 West Bengal

4 Fusion cuisines

4.1 Indian Chinese cuisine

4.2 Malaysian Indian cuisine

4.3 Indian Singaporean cuisine

4.4 Anglo-Indian cuisine

5 Desserts

6 Beverages

6.1 Non-alcoholic beverages

6.2 Alcoholic beverages

6.2.1 Beer

6.2.2 Others

7 Eating habits

8 Dietary restrictions

9 Etiquette

10 Outside of India

10.1 Canada

10.2 China

10.3 Middle East

10.4 Southeast Asia

10.5 United Kingdom

10.6 United States

Indian cuisine

Indian cuisine or Indian food encompasses a wide variety of regional cuisines native to India. Given the range of diversity in soil type, climate and occupations, these cuisines vary significantly from each other and use locally available spices, herbs, vegetables and fruits. Indian food is also heavily influenced by religious and cultural choices. The development of these cuisines have been shaped by Dharmic beliefs, and in particular by vegetarianism, which is a growing dietary trend in Indian society. There has also been Central Asian influence on North Indian cuisine from the years of Mughal and Turkic Delhi Sultanate rule.[2] Indian cuisine has been and is still evolving, as a result of the nation's cultural interactions with other societies. Historical incidents such as foreign invasions, trade relations and colonialism have also played a role in introducing certain foods to the country. For instance, potato, a staple of Indian diet was brought to India by the Portuguese, who also introduced chillies and breadfruit. Indian cuisine has also shaped the history of international relations; the spice trade between India and Europe is often cited by historians as the primary catalyst for Europe'sAge of Discovery. Spices were bought from India and traded around Europe and Asia. It has also influenced other cuisines across the world, especially those from Southeast Asia, the British Isles and the Caribbean.

History

Indian cuisine reflects a 5000-year history of various groups and cultures interacting with the subcontinent, leading to diversity of flavours and regional cuisines found in modern-day India. Later, mughals, British, and Portuguese influence added to the already diverse Indian Cuisine. Food in vedic period

Antiquity
A normal diet in early India consisted of fruit, vegetables, grain, eggs, dairy products, honey, and sometimes meat. Over time, segments of the population embraced vegetarianism. The advent ofBuddhism affected this shift, as well as an equitable climate permitting a variety of fruit, vegetables, and grains to be grown throughout the year. A food classification system that categorised any item as saatvic, raajsic or taamsic developed in Ayurveda. The Bhagavad Gita prescribes certain dietary practices (Chapter 17, Verses 8–10). During this period, consumption of beef becametaboo, due to cattle being considered sacred in Hinduism. Many Indians continue to follow this belief, making the use of beef in Indian cuisine somewhat rare. Beef is generally not eaten by Hindus in India. Middle Ages

During the Middle Ages, several North Indian dynasties were predominant, including the Gupta dynasty. Travellers to India during this time...
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