The Important Roll of Money and Earthly Possessions in the Downfall of Charles Foster Kane

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  • Topic: Citizen Kane, Charles Foster Kane, Opera
  • Pages : 1 (302 words )
  • Download(s) : 29
  • Published : February 20, 2006
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The theme of Citizen Kane is money cannot
buy happiness. This statement is evident throughout many scenes in the movie. He tries to buy his wife happiness, himself happiness, and whomever else he cares for. The main focus of Charles' big spending is his second wife Susan. In the end Charles learns the burden of money.

Charles Foster Kane cares deeply for his wife but does not always find ways to show it besides his pocketbook. In the early stages of their marriage, he thinks that his wife Susan wants to be an opera singer. All with good intentions, he funds the building of a 3 million dollar opera house made especially for his wife. He then buys her a personal voice trainer and coach. After her first show she gets bad reviews and gets angry and wants to quit. But he makes her continue, and all the next shows he makes sure the papers give her amazing reviews. Although in the papers misses Susan Kane is getting wonderful reviews, no one really likes her performance and she knows this and wants to quit. She eventually ends her opera career and finds a little bit of happiness for the time being. The worst is yet to come for Susan. Charles Kane builds the world's biggest house. It is a palace fit for the greatest king of all time. It has everything from a zoo to the world's biggest collection of statues. Shortly after Mister and Misses Kane move in, Misses Kane gets lonesome and moves out and leaves Mister Kane forever. Money can buy many things, but it clearly cannot buy happiness for the Kane family. Mister Kane died rich, powerful, and lonely and miserable as all. This theme stressed is a good lesson that everyone can learn from.
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