The Impact of Cueing on Recall of Brands

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Table of Contents
2. Abstract3
3. Introduction4
4. Theory5
5. Methodology7
6. Results10
6.1. Gender Influence10
6.2. Nationality Influence11
6.3. Familiarity Influence13
6.4. The Influence of the Number of Cues on Car Brands Recall14 6.5. Priming and Car Brands Recall15
7. Discussion16
8. Appendices18
Appendix 8.1 Questionnaire – First Condition18
Appendix 8.2 Questionnaire – Second Condition (Primed – Cheap)19 Appendix 8.3 Questionnaire – Second Condition (Primed – Luxury)20 Appendix 8.4 Questionnaire – Third Condition (Primed – Cheap)21 Appendix 8.5 Questionnaire – Third Condition (Primed – Luxury)22 9. Reference List23

2. Abstract
This paper analyzes the part-list cueing effect and it explains how marketers can utilize cuing strategies to influence the recall of brands by customers. In order to support the part-list cuing effect, a survey was conducted, which proves that providing cues of a category inhibits the recall of additional items in that category. However, there is no support for the fact that when more cues are given fewer items will be recalled. Therefore, it is recommended for marketers to position their products and services next to competitors since a larger evoked set will prevent a customer from searching for alternatives.  

3. Introduction
Many companies in different markets find it increasingly difficult to compete successfully. One way companies try to differentiate themselves from their competitor is to build a strong brand. Companies with strong brands are able to ask premium prices for their products and services. When consumers are deciding for a purchase, they are evaluating their evoked set of brands in order to find the optimal purchase decision. Because a company’s competition consists of the brands incorporated in the consumer’s evoked set, the company should be able to enhance its competitive position by reducing the overall size of the consumer’s evoked set while maintaining its presence in the set (Alba & Chattopadhyay, 1985). It is important for marketers to cue potential customers with the brand of the company. When properly cued, customers become fixated on cued brands and they will recycle those brands and, at the same time, neglecting competing ones (Alba & Chattopadhyay, 1985). When marketers provide the potential customers with a large subset of the total pool of brands as cues, the probability of sampling a noncued brand is reduced (Alba & Chattopadhyay, 1985). As a result, marketers could make use of comparison advertisements that do not mention threatening competitors, because potential customers may exclude those competitive brands from the evoked set (Alba & Chattopadhyay, 1985). This is the so-called “part-list cuing effect”, which indicates that when customers are being shown some items from a list, it becomes harder for them to retrieve other items which were not shown from that same list. Therefore, the part-list cuing effect could be a strong marketing instrument for many companies in order to compete successfully. This research analyzes how marketers could use the part-list cuing effect to influence the recall of brands by consumers. It will examine this by focusing on the car industry. In order to formulate an answer to this problem statement, the following five research questions are formulated: Research Question 1: “How does gender have an influence on the recall of car brands?” Research Question 2: “How does nationality have an influence on the recall of car brands?” Research Question 3: “How does familiarity with car brands have an influence on the recall of car bands?” Research Question 4: “How does the number of car brand cues provided have an influence on the recall of car brands?” Research Question 5: “Does priming have an influence on the recall of car brands in the primed category?” These five research questions will be investigated and discussed in depth in this research. The conclusions and answers for each research...
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