The Hotel Industry

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The future of the hotel industry
Next month, next year, next decade - a blueprint for the future of the hotel industry Closing the gap between dreams and reality

next month, next year, next decade . . .



Foreword

Next month, next year, “It doesn’t do as much as we can dream. next decade… ever solve that one . . .” I don’t know if we’ll This is what one hotel senior executive recently told us when we asked how technology was constraining his business today. We would love to speak to that executive a few years from now and hear that his technology platform does everything he could dream of. That’s our aim and this report is a step towards closing the gap between dreams and reality. As part of our ongoing quest to ensure we deliver future-proof technology, we commissioned research with Inspire Resources in the second half of 2007 to find out exactly what the industry was dreaming about. They scoured the globe and asked a selection of the hotel industry’s top executives, consultants and academics what they think is driving the hotel industry over the short, medium and longterm. By understanding these drivers we aim to deliver technology that will enable our customers to achieve their objectives. And to shape the future of hotel technology. Partnership is fundamental to the way Amadeus does business so we also want to share this research. We hope you will find in it some interesting, surprising, and maybe reassuring insights into the future of our industry. It would give us enormous satisfaction to find that these insights had played an active role in helping you to create the future of our industry. Happy reading,

Antoine Medawar, Managing Director, Hospitality Business Group, Amadeus IT Group 

Section A

The short, medium and long-term drivers

As times change, so too does the terrain on which our businesses are built. What is a top priority today may not remain so tomorrow. In 1987, respondents to a similar survey would not have predicted the birth of the web. Twenty years on, and it may be that there is something equally revolutionary just around the corner. For now, all we can do is predict the future as best we can while trying to prepare for the unexpected. The tables reveal what our panel of thought-leaders say the key business drivers are likely to be over three timeframes - the short term (i.e. the next year or so), the medium term (three to five years) and the long term (from 2012 onwards). They are ranked in the order of importance attributed to them by the survey sample.

Short-term drivers
1. Globalisation 2. Web 2.0/new technologies 3. Demanding/educated customers 4. Price transparency



1

Medium-term drivers
1. Globalisation/emerging geographic markets 2. New technologies 3. Channel shift 4. Demanding/educated customers

2 3
a


Long-term drivers
1. Demanding/educated customers 2. New technologies 3. Hotel ownership

It is significant that the order of the priorities changes, and how some of the priorities disappear altogether as the timeframe extends. For example, web 2.0 is high up the agenda today but in the medium- to long-term will not be an issue. This is presumably because businesses think they will be able to adapt to its demands in the not too distant future.

But it is equally significant how often the same themes emerge. We shall look at three of them – the new breed of customer, new technologies and globalisation – in detail in section B of the report. Section C will briefly look even further into the future, and will summarise what our respondents think the industry will look like in 2012 and beyond.

Section B

The three key drivers of change

1. Demanding/educated customers
Two words cropped up time and again when our panel was asked to describe the nature of the modern traveller - ‘demanding’ and ‘educated’. Whether business or leisure, budget or luxury, he or she expects to feel special, to have their expectations met, to have their...
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