The History of Basketball

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The history of basketball

On December 21 of 1891, James Naismith published 13 rules for a new game using five base ideas. Originally, there was no set rule on the number of players. After experimenting with teams up to 50 players, early games were played by nine players on each side. The reason was that 18 students showed up for Naismith's class on that day. He asked his class to play a match in the Armory Street court, 9 versus 9 using a soccer ball and two fruit baskets. Naismith was the inventor of the new game. Someone proposed to call it “Naismith Game”, but he said "We have a ball and a basket, why don’t we call it basket ball"? The object of the game was to throw the soccer ball, into the fruit baskets nailed to the lower railing of the gym balcony. Every time a point was scored, the game was halted so the janitor could bring out a ladder and retrieve the ball. Later, the bottoms of the fruit baskets were removed. There were other differences between Naismith’s first idea and the game played today. The peach baskets were closed, and balls had to be retrieved manually, until a small hole was put in the bottom of the peach basket to poke the ball out using a stick. Only in 1906 were metal hoops, nets and back boards introduced. Moreover, earlier the soccer ball was replaced by a Spalding ball, similar to the one used today. Originally, a scored goal was counted as just one point, and they would give one point to a team anytime three consecutive fouls were called on the opponent. More rules were changed as the time passed like giving more points to Free throws, field goal, etc. In 1961 the short lived American Basketball League played with the three point shot. In 1967, the three point shot was introduced into International basketball by FIBA. The three point shot was adopted by the National Basketball Association (NBA) in 1977 and by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) in 1980.
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