The Harm of Development

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  • Topic: Ozone depletion, Ozone layer, Chlorofluorocarbon
  • Pages : 2 (691 words )
  • Download(s) : 162
  • Published : May 15, 2013
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The Harm of Development

Development, Advancement and Technology: People think of these words as positive things. These are simple words and have big meanings. We all know that these help us in our daily living, but these are only good for our present lives. The fact that every country in this world aims for these, we can’t also hide the harm it does to Mother Nature.

Urban growth has been a growing concern now. Tall buildings and infrastructures comes with forest denudation, land reformation, and logging. The study, led by Ruth DeFries of New York's Columbia University, looked at satellite data for forest loss in 41 countries from 2000 to 2005 and matched this against a host of other factors. Two much bigger causes accelerated forest loss, they found. One was the demographic growth of the host country's cities. Urbanization raises consumption levels and boosts demands for agricultural products. City dwellers eat more processed food and meat, which in turn encourages large-scale farming that leads to forest clearance (“Urban growth, farm exports drive tropical deforestation”).

As modernization conquers us, we use unnecessary things that contribute to Ozone depletion. Things like the air-conditioning unit, aerosol and other beauty and hygiene products emit CFC or Chlorofluorocarbon, an organic compound that contributes to ozone depletion in the upper atmosphere. Another thing that contributes widely to the ozone depletion is the increased air pollution. The average American spends the equivalent of eight 55-hour work weeks behind the steering wheel of a car annually. The more usage of vehicles, the air pollution increases(“Negative Effects of Urban Sprawl”). In fact, according to A team of scientists around Ashley Jones and Jo Urban from Sweden’s Chalmers University of Technology , in 1979 to 1997 the ozone layer has declined by 7% per decade, and by 1997 to 2008 the decline has increased by 1.4% per decade(“The Ozone Hole”). Just imagine our Ozone...
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