The Great Popularity of Vatican City

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Vatican City
Table Of Contents
I-ABSTRACT

II-INTRODUCTION

III-DISCUSSIONS/RESULTS
A.History ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 4-5 B.CULTURE ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 6-7 C.GOVERNMENT SYSTEM ………………………………………………………………………… 8-10

IV-CONCLUSION/RECOMMENDATIONS
A.CONCLUSION ……………………………………………………………………………………… 11-12 B.RECOMMENDATIONS …………………………………………………………………………. 13-15

1 I-ABSTRACT

2 II-INTRODUCTION
There are many reasons for the great popularity of Vatican City stamps.  The Vatican has traditionally maintained a fairly conservative issuing policy, which presently consists of about a dozen commemorative series per year.  Vatican stamps feature a wide range of religious and historical subjects, including many that are of interest to topical collectors.  Adding to their allure is the fact that these stamps are issued by the world's smallest sovereign state, whose influence extends far beyond its 108.7 acres. The political existence of the Vatican City State dates from the three Lateran Treaties of February 1929, which settled the Roman Question (see An Introduction to Roman States Philately) and provided for mutual recognition between the Kingdom of Italy and the Holy See.  These treaties further required Italy to cooperate in setting up a postal service for the Holy See.  Negotiations between the Vatican and the Italian government resulted in an agreement to dispatch Vatican mail from either Rome’s Ferroviaria (railway) or Arrivi e Distribuzione (Arrivals and Distribution) post office, depending on its destination. On 1 August 1929, the Vatican released its first stamps, a definitive series known to collectors as the “Conciliation” issue.  It consisted of thirteen regular issues and two special delivery stamps (1-13, E1-2).  The seven low values, which depict the papal tiara and crossed keys, are strongly reminiscent of the Pontifical State stamps.  The remaining values feature a photo of the reigning Pontiff, Pius XI.  This series of stamps was overprinted numerous times during the next decade, making it one of the most interesting subfields of Vatican philately.  On 10 January 1931 the 30c value in the series was issued overprinted in red vermillion(14) by the Vatican Polyglot Press.  The new value, 25c, paid several heavily used domestic letter and foreign postcard rates.  On the same date, the 5c, 10c, 20c, 30c, L2, and L2.50 values were issued overprinted “SEGNATASSE” in black for use as postage due stamps (J1-6); the entire Conciliation series was also overprinted with the words “PER PACCHI” in black for use as parcel post stamps (Q1-Q15).
3 In 1934 and again in 1937, the six high values of the Conciliation issue were surcharged with new values (35-40).  Today, these two provisional overprints are the rarest of all Vatican stamps, and when purchased they should be expertised and accompanied by a certificate. The final overprinting of the Conciliation series was made in 1939 at the death of Pope Pius XI.  The seven low values were overprinted "SEDE VACANTE / MCMXXXIX" (61-67) for postal use during the interregnum period preceding the election of a new pope.  This inaugurated a tradition that has been observed at the death of every subsequent pope (see A Postal History of the Sede Vacante).   The Conciliation issue was replaced in 1933 by the so-called “Gardens and Medallions” set (19-34, E3-4) which pictures the arms of Pope...
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