The Great Gatsby

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An idealist is a person who knows what they want and will try to do anything to obtain it, it turns into their goal in life. Gatsby displays that he is very hard working, but after he meets Daisy again all he can think about is to try and win her back at all costs, he figures that the only way to win her back is to impress her with his money. Now that Gatsby is invading the relationship between Tom and Daisy it plays a big part on how Gatsby dies. In the novel The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, Jay Gatsby is a deluded fool because he is obsessed with Daisy and his money which in the end leads to his death, however he is also considered to be an idealist because he works extremely hard to become rich and successful.

Gatsby's obsession with Daisy was one of the main things that cause his death at the end of the novel. When Daisy hits and kills Myrtle Wilson with the car, all that Gatsby cares about is if Daisy is ok, "[Is] she killed? ‘Yes' ‘I thought so; I told Daisy I thought so. It's better that the shock should come all at once. She stood it pretty well'… He spoke as if Daisy's reaction [is] the only thing that [matters]" (Fitzgerald 136). This is an example of his obsessions with Daisy because Myrtle dies and he does not even care about, he does not turn himself or Daisy in, Gatsby does not even try to stop the car which is a very foolish thing to do, maybe if Gatsby turned himself in he could have convinced Mr. Wilson that it was an accident and he maybe would not have killed him. Another example of when Gatsby's obsessions with Daisy are when he throws huge parties, when Jordan says. "I [think] he half expected her to wander into one of his parties, some night" (77). This shows his obsession because he is throwing all of his parties hoping Daisy will wander in and he can try to get back together with her. When Gatsby finally meets Daisy again all he does is show off his money to her, "I've [got] a man in England who buys me cloths. He sends over a...
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