The Gran Torino Critique

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 312
  • Published : October 23, 2010
Open Document
Text Preview
“The Gran Torino” allows Clint Eastwood to play a role as a Polish American factory worker and a Korean War veteran, who has to face his prejudice beliefs and in doing so creates a heart felt experience with a dash of unparalleled humor. His rough stern traits was forged over time, living a solitary life unable to get along with the only family he has left. With this cynical mind set on the world ever since the war each passing day for him gets darker. Until one day theres a sudden change of events to that comes into play, and the very fabrication of how he thinks takes a different turn. You will foresee this transition with anticipation throughout the movie, and this is where the charm lies its guaranteed to leave you in awe.

Lets start with the atmosphere this film portrays, it immediately grabs your attention because your coming into this thinking this is going to be a “Dirty Harry” flick provided that Clint Eastwood is playing the lead role. Both film and performance are instinctively sly coming on with deceptive simplicity, only to become something mind boggling, powerful, and surprisingly tender. The cast chemistry is outstanding with a ensemble of b-list actors you would have thought else wise. Evidently though this works surprisingly well, as Eastwood’s stone cold persona is outset by his indirect humor toward everyone else, as he blatantly slurs out indirect racial comments through out the movie, it will have you laughing out loud in the retrospective its done in. The set is superbly done as well, it captures the feel to the point, very old fashion meets “Dirty Harry” 1971 urban western movie directed by Don Siegal.

post modern. This is a result of location planning and finding discrete areas of Detroit for its urban landscape and suburban setting, it is very clear that the director knew what he was doing to keep you engrossed.

Just as “Unforgiven” was a tragic insight on Eastwood's legacy in the old western...
tracking img