The Goal Summary

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  • Topic: Bottleneck, Choke point, Network performance
  • Pages : 8 (3273 words )
  • Download(s) : 41
  • Published : December 22, 2012
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Chapter One The first chapter gets the reader acquainted with Mr. Alex Rogo and his apparent problems with his production plant. This is shown through a confrontation between Mr. Rogo and his boss Mr. Peach, the Division Vice President. The dispute is over an overdue order #41427. Through their conversation it’s learned that Mr. Peach will not settle for anything less than the order being shipped today, and since the plant is neither productive nor profitable, Alex has three months to show an improvement or the plant will be shut down! Chapter TwoThis chapter gives insight to Alex’s home life. Since moving back to his hometown six months ago, it seems adjustment isn’t going well for his family. It’s great for Alex, but it’s a big change from the city life that his wife is used to. You also experience Mr. Rogo’s background through his reflections back on his travels to eventually find himself back where he started. "He’s now 38 years old and a crummy plant manager". By the way, the order #41427 does get shipped, but not very efficiently. All hands in the plant are working on one order with forbidden overtime to boot. Chapter ThreeMr. Peach calls a meeting at headquarters for all plant managers and his staff. At the meeting everybody finds out how bad things are and are given goals to achieve for the next quarter. Through the grapevine Mr. Rogo finds out perhaps why Mr. Peach has been acting so erratic lately, the Division has one year to improve or it’s going to be sold, along with Mr. Peach. Chapter FourWhile at this meeting, Alex thinks back on a recent business trip where he ran into an old physics professor, Jonah, at the airport. Jonah puzzles Alex with how well he knows how Alex’s plant is doing. Jonah has no knowledge of where Alex is employed. Johan predicts the problems of high inventories and not meeting shipping dates. He also states that there is only one goal for all companies, and anything that brings you closer to achieving it is productive and all other things are not productive. (See What is this thing called Theory of Constraints for more on Alex's encounter with Jonah.) Chapter FiveAlex decides to leave the meeting at the break. He has no particular place he would like to go; he just knows this meeting isn’t for him, not today. He needs to understand what the "goal" is. After a pizza and a six pack of beer it hits him, money. The "goal" is to make money and anything that brings us closer to it is productive and anything that doesn’t isn’t. Chapter SixMr. Rogo sits down with one of his accountants and together they define what is needed in terms of achieving the goal. Net profit needs to increase along with simultaneously increasing return on investment and cash flow. Now all that is needed is to put his specific operations in those terms. Chapter SevenAlex makes the decision to stay with the company for the last three months and try to make a change. Then he decides he needs to find Jonah. Chapter EightAlex finally speaks to Jonah. He is given three terms that will help him run his plant, throughput, inventory, and operational expense. Jonah states that everything in the plant can be classified under these three terms. "Throughput is the rate at which the system generates money through sales." "Inventory is all the money that the system has invested in purchasing things which it intends to sell." "Operational expense is all the money the system spends in order to turn inventory into throughput." Alex needs more explanation. Chapter Nine Alex fresh off his talk with Jonah gets word that the head of the company wants to come down for a photo opportunity with one of Alex’s robots. This gets Alex thinking of the efficiency of these robots. With the help of the accountant, inventory control woman, and the production manager, Alex discovers the robots increased costs, operational expenses, and therefore were less productive. Implementing the robots increased costs by not reducing others, like direct labor. The...
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