The Gilded Age In American History

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Ch. 15 Essay #4

American achievement in the sciences differed from those in the arts, in that the arts were more successful. Early America saw a huge influx of writers and poets, all influential to present day America, and all easily recognizable by thousands of ordinary people.

America in the mid 1800’s was a boiling pot of new religious, industrial, and artistic reforms. With the massive amounts of immigrants that the industrial revolution brought in, new views and perceptions were added to the country’s population. Many of these people, along with Americans themselves, would become famous writers and rack in some of the most influential pieces of their time. This includes Washington Irving, an American author who was responsible for “Rip Van Winkle” and “Legend of Sleepy Hollow.” Another is Edgar Allen Poe, a writer and poet, famous for such works as “The Raven” and “Annabel Lee.” Others include Herman Melville’s “Moby Dick” and James Cooper’s “The Last of the Mohicans.” Many famous literary works emerged out of Early America.

Another aspect of Early America is the religious fervor that emerged. Many philosophies and religious views including Deism, Transcendentalism, and Mormonism. Famous Deists included James Madison, Thomas Jefferson, and Benjamin Franklin. Some famous Transcendentalists were Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, and Margaret Fuller. Many events in Mormonism occurred in early America. Joseph Smith, considered the founder and prophet of Mormonism, wrote the Book of Mormon. On April 6, 1830, Joseph Smith organized The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and became its first president. Later in its creation, a Brigham Young would be considered the “Mormon Moses” and lead the persecuted Latter-Day Saints to their promised land in Utah.
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