The Giant Pacific Octopus

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The Giant Pacific Octopus

This paper is about octopus dofleni, which is a bottom-dwelling octopus that lives on coasts of the pacific ocean, from Northern Japan to California. This essay will provide a brief overview of its life, habits and other characteristics of this, intelligent and creative invertebrate and member of the Octopodidae family.

The life of the pacific giant may begin at any time of the year. The mating season however tends to peak in the month of December, with most of their eggs being laid in April and May.

Octopuses reproduction is sexual and takes place in the somewhat shallow depths of 25 -100m and can last hours. The fertilization process begins with the male octopus, he uses his third right tentacle which has no suckers but a modified structure known as the hectocotylus to pass spermatophore from within his mantle cavity into the the mantle cavity of the female, also known as the oviduct. Male octopuses may mate with more than one female in their lifetime and females tend have a preference of larger males for their mates. While the female lives until the eggs have time to hatch, the male dies only a few months after breeding.

Reproduction

After being fertilized the female will close herself off in a den here she will lay anywhere between 20,000 and 100,000 eggs over a span of 2-3 weeks. Incubation can take from six to eight months. During this time the female octopus will take to cleaning algae and bacteria off the eggs as well as blowing water at them to keep a steady supply of oxygen. After the eggs hatch, the mother clears an opening in the den for her young to swim up to the surface of the ocean.

Life Span

After hatching the octopus larva become much like plankton, drifting along the surface of the ocean feeding on particles of dead food from other larger animals. This stage lasts 30-90 days at which point the octopus descends to the bottom of the ocean where it will spend the rest of its life. The Pacific giant...
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