The Future of Retail: Rise of Click-and-Mortar

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The Future of Retail: Rise of Click-And-Mortar|
The focus on keeping shoppers in-store when examining a product in a store and then comparing prices online| |

[Type the abstract of the document here. The abstract is typically a short summary of the contents of the document. Type the abstract of the document here. The abstract is typically a short summary of the contents of the document.]|

Abstract

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Table of Contents
1. Introduction…………………………………………………………………...P. 1 2. Methods…………………………………………………………………….....P. 12 3. Results………………………………………………………………………...P. 28 4. Discussion……………………………………………………………………..P. 34 5. References……………………………………………………………………..P. 48 6. Tables………………………………………………………………………….P. 52 7. Figures………………………………………………………………………...P. 54

Generational trends and tastes lead to icon methods of marketing for every generation. From 1996 when Larry Page & Sergey Brin launch Google we had the world's most dominant search engine that changed everything in the advertising industry.

No longer were customers passive consumers of media. Now the Internet permitted them to search for what interested them, when it interested them. In short order, Google recognized its power and began selling access to its visitors in a number of ways, including versions of keyword ads and banner ads. For a very long time, customers have done their research online, and then gone into stores to buy things, from consumer reports to millions of enthusiast blogging sites rating and product influence have never been adequately mirrored by advertising. Marketing has consisted of strong online markets, such as Amazon and Ebay or offline markets as with many of the original big box stores. Appropriately marketers either target on- or offline shoppers because of the difficulty of matching on- and offline behaviors. As we are seeing the evolutional push of the mobile online presence waking retailers to address the crossover of in store, online, and savvy consumers.

Search plays a big part here too, driven by the fact that almost three-quarters of smartphone users use the internet while they're in a shop. Again consumers known as 'showroomers' has meant very little to everyone but the car dealer industry; the profile for this consumer is referred to in my ways Generation Y, Millennials, and Gen Next is instinctly adoptive of technology and compares prices, delivery times and so on across a number of retailers while in-store. Showrooming is both a challenge and an opportunity for retailers. Opportunities arise while people are conducting those searches, they're looking for alternative places to buy; a challenge due to the online experience is dominating with fluid a shopping environment where competitors, ratings, reviews, and deals are only a click away. Despite this rapid change in customer behavior, Google suggests in a study (conducted by Sterling Research and SmithGeiger, independent market research firms). The report surveyed 1,088 US adult smartphone Internet users in July 2012.

“The problem (and opportunity) is big...
While nearly 75% of users prefer a mobile-friendly site, 96% of consumers say they’ve encountered sites that were clearly not designed for mobile devices. This is both a big problem and a big opportunity for companies seeking to engage with mobile users.

Mobile-friendly sites turn users into customers
The fastest path to mobile customers is through a mobile-friendly site. If your site offers a great mobile experience, users are more likely to make a purchase. * When they visited a mobile-friendly site, 74% of people say they’re more likely to return to that site in the future * 67% of mobile users say that when they visit a mobile-friendly site, they’re more likely to buy a site’s product or service

Not having a mobile-friendly site helps your competitors
A great mobile site experience is becoming increasingly important,...
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